Shinkansen(Shinkansen)

Train Type: Shinkansen

The Shinkansen (Japanese: 新幹線/しんかんせん Shinkansen) is Japan's high-speed rail system and the world's first high-speed rail system to be put into commercial operation. It uses a standard rail (1435mm) gauge and is pure passenger transport. The first line is the Tokaido Shinkansen connecting Tokyo and Osaka. It was opened to traffic on October 1, 1964 before the opening of the Tokyo Olympics. After years of expansion, there are currently 9 lines, including two shorter lines. "Mini Shinkansen" connects most of Japan's important cities. Initially developed and operated by the Japanese state-owned railway, the national railway was privatized and then continuation by the JR Group. Currently, there are five JR companies including JR Hokkaido, JR East Japan, JR Tokai, JR West Japan, and JR Kyushu.

The Shinkansen is designed to be suitable for both fast and mass transportation. Therefore, its construction and operation technology are different from traditional railways. For example, the power-distributed train is fully used, the track is fully integrated, and the automatic train control system is the shortest. Minutes of shift run. In addition to the mini Shinkansen, the train's maximum speed can reach 240 to 320 kilometers per hour, but it has set a record of 443 kilometers per hour during speed testing (by the "300X" experimental train in 1996). Created). As an important symbol of Japan's railway technology, the Shinkansen technology is also exported overseas. For example, Taiwan's high-speed railway uses the Shinkansen as the system basis, while the Japanese high-speed railway, the Indian high-speed railway, and the Japanese technology and vehicles. High-speed rail and Texas high-speed rail are also under construction or planning.

1st Class Deluxe(GranClass)

The Shinkansen (Japanese: 新幹線/しんかんせん Shinkansen) is Japan's high-speed rail system and the world's first high-speed rail system to be put into commercial operation. It uses a standard rail (1435mm) gauge and is pure passenger transport. The first line is the Tokaido Shinkansen connecting Tokyo and Osaka. It was opened to traffic on October 1, 1964 before the opening of the Tokyo Olympics. After years of expansion, there are currently 9 lines, including two shorter lines. "Mini Shinkansen" connects most of Japan's important cities. Initially developed and operated by the Japanese state-owned railway, the national railway was privatized and then continuation by the JR Group. Currently, there are five JR companies including JR Hokkaido, JR East Japan, JR Tokai, JR West Japan, and JR Kyushu.

The Shinkansen is designed to be suitable for both fast and mass transportation. Therefore, its construction and operation technology are different from traditional railways. For example, the power-distributed train is fully used, the track is fully integrated, and the automatic train control system is the shortest. Minutes of shift run. In addition to the mini Shinkansen, the train's maximum speed can reach 240 to 320 kilometers per hour, but it has set a record of 443 kilometers per hour during speed testing (by the "300X" experimental train in 1996). Created). As an important symbol of Japan's railway technology, the Shinkansen technology is also exported overseas. For example, Taiwan's high-speed railway uses the Shinkansen as the system basis, while the Japanese high-speed railway, the Indian high-speed railway, and the Japanese technology and vehicles. High-speed rail and Texas high-speed rail are also under construction or planning.

Facilities in the coach
  • * washroom
  • * luggage rack
  • * Wi-Fi
  • * Power outlet
  • * Vending machine
  • * Table Board
  • * Reading light
  • * Free meals and drinks
  • * Blanket
  • * Towel
  • * Slippers
  • * Eye masks

1st Class(Green)

The Shinkansen (Japanese: 新幹線/しんかんせん Shinkansen) is Japan's high-speed rail system and the world's first high-speed rail system to be put into commercial operation. It uses a standard rail (1435mm) gauge and is pure passenger transport. The first line is the Tokaido Shinkansen connecting Tokyo and Osaka. It was opened to traffic on October 1, 1964 before the opening of the Tokyo Olympics. After years of expansion, there are currently 9 lines, including two shorter lines. "Mini Shinkansen" connects most of Japan's important cities. Initially developed and operated by the Japanese state-owned railway, the national railway was privatized and then continuation by the JR Group. Currently, there are five JR companies including JR Hokkaido, JR East Japan, JR Tokai, JR West Japan, and JR Kyushu.

The Shinkansen is designed to be suitable for both fast and mass transportation. Therefore, its construction and operation technology are different from traditional railways. For example, the power-distributed train is fully used, the track is fully integrated, and the automatic train control system is the shortest. Minutes of shift run. In addition to the mini Shinkansen, the train's maximum speed can reach 240 to 320 kilometers per hour, but it has set a record of 443 kilometers per hour during speed testing (by the "300X" experimental train in 1996). Created). As an important symbol of Japan's railway technology, the Shinkansen technology is also exported overseas. For example, Taiwan's high-speed railway uses the Shinkansen as the system basis, while the Japanese high-speed railway, the Indian high-speed railway, and the Japanese technology and vehicles. High-speed rail and Texas high-speed rail are also under construction or planning.

Facilities in the coach
  • * washroom
  • * luggage rack
  • * Wi-Fi
  • * Power outlet
  • * Table board
  • * reading light
  • * Footrest
  • * towel
  • * Drinks

2nd Class Reserved

The Shinkansen (Japanese: 新幹線/しんかんせん Shinkansen) is Japan's high-speed rail system and the world's first high-speed rail system to be put into commercial operation. It uses a standard rail (1435mm) gauge and is pure passenger transport. The first line is the Tokaido Shinkansen connecting Tokyo and Osaka. It was opened to traffic on October 1, 1964 before the opening of the Tokyo Olympics. After years of expansion, there are currently 9 lines, including two shorter lines. "Mini Shinkansen" connects most of Japan's important cities. Initially developed and operated by the Japanese state-owned railway, the national railway was privatized and then continuation by the JR Group. Currently, there are five JR companies including JR Hokkaido, JR East Japan, JR Tokai, JR West Japan, and JR Kyushu.

The Shinkansen is designed to be suitable for both fast and mass transportation. Therefore, its construction and operation technology are different from traditional railways. For example, the power-distributed train is fully used, the track is fully integrated, and the automatic train control system is the shortest. Minutes of shift run. In addition to the mini Shinkansen, the train's maximum speed can reach 240 to 320 kilometers per hour, but it has set a record of 443 kilometers per hour during speed testing (by the "300X" experimental train in 1996). Created). As an important symbol of Japan's railway technology, the Shinkansen technology is also exported overseas. For example, Taiwan's high-speed railway uses the Shinkansen as the system basis, while the Japanese high-speed railway, the Indian high-speed railway, and the Japanese technology and vehicles. High-speed rail and Texas high-speed rail are also under construction or planning.

Facilities in the coach
  • * washroom
  • * Luggage rack
  • * Wi-Fi
  • * Power outlet
  • * Vending machine
  • * Snack trolley
  • * Table board

2nd Class Free

The Shinkansen (Japanese: 新幹線/しんかんせん Shinkansen) is Japan's high-speed rail system and the world's first high-speed rail system to be put into commercial operation. It uses a standard rail (1435mm) gauge and is pure passenger transport. The first line is the Tokaido Shinkansen connecting Tokyo and Osaka. It was opened to traffic on October 1, 1964 before the opening of the Tokyo Olympics. After years of expansion, there are currently 9 lines, including two shorter lines. "Mini Shinkansen" connects most of Japan's important cities. Initially developed and operated by the Japanese state-owned railway, the national railway was privatized and then continuation by the JR Group. Currently, there are five JR companies including JR Hokkaido, JR East Japan, JR Tokai, JR West Japan, and JR Kyushu.

The Shinkansen is designed to be suitable for both fast and mass transportation. Therefore, its construction and operation technology are different from traditional railways. For example, the power-distributed train is fully used, the track is fully integrated, and the automatic train control system is the shortest. Minutes of shift run. In addition to the mini Shinkansen, the train's maximum speed can reach 240 to 320 kilometers per hour, but it has set a record of 443 kilometers per hour during speed testing (by the "300X" experimental train in 1996). Created). As an important symbol of Japan's railway technology, the Shinkansen technology is also exported overseas. For example, Taiwan's high-speed railway uses the Shinkansen as the system basis, while the Japanese high-speed railway, the Indian high-speed railway, and the Japanese technology and vehicles. High-speed rail and Texas high-speed rail are also under construction or planning.

Facilities in the coach
  • * washroom
  • * luggage rack
  • * Wi-Fi
  • * Power outlet
  • * vending machine
  • * Snack cart
  • * small table