ROME(ROMA)

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ROME(ROMA)

The Eternal City has shrugged off sacks and fascists, urban planning disasters and traffic snarls and is as impressive to the visitor now as two thousand years ago.

Hot Places to Visit

Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano

The Papal Archbasilica of St. John in Lateran commonly known as St. John Lateran Archbasilica, St. John Lateran Basilica, St. John Lateran, or simply the Lateran Basilica, is the cathedral church of Rome, Italy and therefore houses the cathedra, or ecclesiastical seat, of the Roman Pontiff (Pope). It is the oldest of and has precedence among the four papal major basilicas, all of which are in Rome, because it is the oldest church in the West and houses the cathedra of the Roman Pontiff. It has the title of ecumenical mother church of the Roman Catholic faithful. The current archpriest is Agostino Vallini, Cardinal Vicar General for the Diocese of Rome. The President of the French Republic, currently François Hollande, is ex officio the "first and only honorary canon" of the archbasilica, a title that the heads of state of France have possessed since King Henry IV. The large Latin inscription on the façade reads: Clemens XII Pont Max Anno V Christo Salvatori In Hon SS Ioan Bapt et Evang; which is a highly abbreviated inscription which translates to: "Pope Clement XII, in the fifth year [of his Pontificate], dedicated this building to Christ the Savior, in honor of Saints John the Baptist and John the Evangelist". The inscription indicates, along with its full title (see below), that the archbasilica was originally dedicated to Christ the Savior and, centuries later, co-dedicated to St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist. As the Cathedral of the Pope qua Bishop of Rome, it ranks superior to all other churches of the Roman Catholic Church, including St. Peter's Basilica, and therefore it alone is titled "Archbasilica" among all other basilicas. The archbasilica is sited in the City of Rome, outside and distanced from Vatican City proper, which is approximately 4 km (2.5 mi) to its northwest, although the archbasilica and its adjoining edifices have extraterritorial status from Italy as one of the properties of the Holy See, subject to the sovereignty of the latter, pursuant to the Lateran Treaty of 1929 with Italy.

Colosseum

The Colosseum or Coliseum also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre (Latin: Amphitheatrum Flavium; Italian: Anfiteatro Flavio or Colosseo ), is an oval amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy. Built of concrete and sand, it is the largest amphitheatre ever built. The Colosseum is situated just east of the Roman Forum. Construction began under the emperor Vespasian in AD 72, and was completed in AD 80 under his successor and heir Titus. Further modifications were made during the reign of Domitian (81–96). These three emperors are known as the Flavian dynasty, and the amphitheatre was named in Latin for its association with their family name (Flavius). The Colosseum could hold, it is estimated, between 50,000 and 80,000 spectators, having an average audience of some 65,000; it was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles (for only a short time as the hypogeum was soon filled in with mechanisms to support the other activities), animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on Classical mythology. The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era. It was later reused for such purposes as housing, workshops, quarters for a religious order, a fortress, a quarry, and a Christian shrine. Although partially ruined because of damage caused by earthquakes and stone-robbers, the Colosseum is still an iconic symbol of Imperial Rome. It is one of Rome's most popular tourist attractions and also has links to the Roman Catholic Church, as each Good Friday the Pope leads a torchlit "Way of the Cross" procession that starts in the area around the Colosseum. The Colosseum is also depicted on the Italian version of the five-cent euro coin. The Colosseum's original Latin name was Amphitheatrum Flavium, often anglicized as Flavian Amphitheatre. The building was constructed by emperors of the Flavian dynasty, following the reign of Nero. This name is still used in modern English, but generally the structure is better known as the Colosseum. In antiquity, Romans may have referred to the Colosseum by the unofficial name Amphitheatrum Caesareum (with Caesareum an adjective pertaining to the title Caesar), but this name may have been strictly poetic as it was not exclusive to the Colosseum; Vespasian and Titus, builders of the Colosseum, also constructed an amphitheater of the same name in Puteoli (modern Pozzuoli). The name Colosseum has long been believed to be derived from a colossal statue of Nero nearby (the statue of Nero was named after the Colossus of Rhodes). This statue was later remodeled by Nero's successors into the likeness of Helios (Sol) or Apollo, the sun god, by adding the appropriate solar crown. Nero's head was also replaced several times with the heads of succeeding emperors. Despite its pagan links, the statue remained standing well into the medieval era and was credited with magical powers. It came to be seen as an iconic symbol of the permanence of Rome. In the 8th century, a famous epigram attributed to the Venerable Bede celebrated the symbolic significance of the statue in a prophecy that is variously quoted: Quamdiu stat Colisæus, stat et Roma; quando cadet colisæus, cadet et Roma; quando cadet Roma, cadet et mundus ("as long as the Colossus stands, so shall Rome; when the Colossus falls, Rome shall fall; when Rome falls, so falls the world"). This is often mistranslated to refer to the Colosseum rather than the Colossus (as in, for instance, Byron's poem Childe Harold's Pilgrimage). However, at the time that the Pseudo-Bede wrote, the masculine noun coliseus was applied to the statue rather than to what was still known as the Flavian amphitheatre. The Colossus did eventually fall, possibly being pulled down to reuse its bronze. By the year 1000 the name "Colosseum" had been coined to refer to the amphitheatre. The statue itself was largely forgotten and only its base survives, situated between the Colosseum and the nearby Temple of Venus and Roma. The name further evolved to Coliseum during the Middle Ages. In Italy, the amphitheatre is still known as il Colosseo, and other Romance languages have come to use similar forms such as Coloseumul (Romanian), le Colisée (French), el Coliseo (Spanish) and o Coliseu (Portuguese).

Via Condotti

Via Condotti is a busy and fashionable street of Rome, Italy. In Roman times it was one of the streets that crossed the ancient Via Flaminia and enabled people who transversed the Tiber to reach the Pincio hill. It begins at the foot of the Spanish steps and is named after conduits or channels which carried water to the Baths of Agrippa. Today, it is the street which contains the greatest number of Rome-based Italian fashion retailers, equivalent to Milan's Via Montenapoleone, Paris' Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré, Florence's Via de' Tornabuoni or London's Bond Street. Caffé Greco (or Antico Caffé Greco), perhaps the most famous café in Rome was established at Via dei Condotti 86 in 1760, and attracted figures such as Stendhal, Goethe, Byron, Liszt and Keats to have coffee there. Guglielmo Marconi, inventor of radio, lived at Via dei Condotti 11, until his death in 1937. Being near the Spanish steps, the street is visited by large numbers of tourists. In May 1986, fashion designer Valentino filed suit to close a McDonald's shortly after it opened near the Spanish steps, complaining of "noise and disgusting odours" below his six-story palazzo in the vicinity of Via Condotti. But to the dismay of some Romans, McDonald's overcame the obstacles and is successful. Via Condotti is a center of fashion shopping in Rome. Dior, Gucci, Valentino, Hermès, Armani, Jimmy Choo, La Perla, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo, Furla, Burberry, Céline, Dolce & Gabbana, Max Mara, Alberta Ferretti, Trussardi, Buccellati, Bulgari, Damiani, Tod's, Zegna, Cartier, Bally, Montblanc, Tiffany & Co., Louis Vuitton have stores on Via Condotti. Others, such as Laura Biagiotti, have their offices there.

Palazzo Massimo

A magnificent collection of ancient Roman sculptures, mosaics and wall paintings, including the famous paintings from the Imperial-era villa discovered under the Villa Farnesina, as well as the dining room from the Empress Livia's villa at Prima Porta. Located across the piazza from Termini, opposite the Baths of Diocletian.

Vecchia Roma Resort

Just 250 metres from the Circus Maximus, Vecchia Roma Resort is located in the historic centre of Rome. This property offers a garden, free Wi-Fi and air-conditioned rooms. With wooden furnishings, these rooms feature a flat-screen TV and a small fridge. The private bathroom includes a hairdryer and free toiletries. Vecchia Roma is 500 metres from the Giardino degli Aranci garden and a 5-minute walk from Circo Massimo Metro Station. The Coliseum is 1 km away.

Apostolic Palace

The Apostolic Palace is the official residence of the Pope, which is located in Vatican City. It is also known as the Papal Palace, Palace of the Vatican and Vatican Palace. The Vatican itself refers to the building as the Palace of Sixtus V in honor of Pope Sixtus V. The building contains the Papal Apartments, various offices of the Catholic Church and the Holy See, private and public chapels, Vatican Museums, and the Vatican Library, including the Sistine Chapel, Raphael Rooms, and Borgia Apartment. The modern tourist can see these last and other parts of the palace, but other parts, such as the Sala Regia and Cappella Paolina, are closed to tourists. The Scala Regia can be seen into from one end but not entered.

Castel Sant'Angelo

The Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as Castel Sant'Angelo is a towering cylindrical building in Parco Adriano, Rome, Italy. It was initially commissioned by the Roman Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family. The building was later used by the popes as a fortress and castle, and is now a museum. The Castle was once the tallest building in Rome.

RotondaPantheon

Set in the heart of Rome, RotondaPantheon features modern accommodation with free WiFi access. Breakfast is offered daily in a communal room. With air conditioning, rooms come with a flat-screen TV. The private bathroom includes a hairdryer. Guests can taste local specialities and typical Italian food at the cafes and restaurants in the immediate surroundings. Piazza Navona Square is 500 metres from RotondaPantheon. The Trevi Fountain is a 8-minute walk away.

Hot Activities

Trastevere

Trastevere is the 13th rione of Rome, on the west bank of the Tiber, south of Vatican City, and within Municipio I.

Bernini

Gian Lorenzo Bernini was an Italian sculptor and architect.

Modern movement

Modern architecture or modernist architecture is a term applied to a group of styles of architecture which emerged in the first half of the 20th century and became dominant after World War II.

Borromini

Francesco Borromini, byname of Francesco Castelli was an Italian architect born in today's Ticino who, with his contemporaries Gian Lorenzo Bernini and Pietro da Cortona, was a leading figure in th...

della Porta

Giacomo della Porta was an Italian architect and sculptor, who worked on many important buildings in Rome, including St. Peter's Basilica.

Maderno

Carlo Maderno was an Italian architect, born in today's Ticino, who is remembered as one of the fathers of Baroque architecture.

Tours

Colosseum and Palatine Hill Family Tour

Discover the main monuments of Ancient Rome through the eyes of your child on a family friendly tour of the Colosseum and Palatine Hill. Get fun and fascinating explanations about the Roman Empire that won’t leave you bored!

Moonlight Tour of the Colosseum and Ancient Rome

See Rome in a new light during this 2.5-hour moonlight tour of the Colosseum and ancient Rome. Visit several monuments of ancient Rome, including the Colosseum, as well as having views from restricted areas. This tour runs with a maximum of 25 people and is a great way to spend an evening in the Colosseum after it's closed to the general public.

Colosseum Tour with Arena, Hypogeum and Third Tier. Hotel Pick-up included

Explore the Colosseum and surrounding area on this 3.5-hour private tour. Experience the emotion of a Roman gladiator as you descend with your private guide below the Colosseum, where gladiators, prisoners and wild animals prepared to face their fate in the arena above. Climb the Third Tier and enjoy one of the best panoramic views in Rome. Visit the Roman Forum and Capitoline Hill.

Colosseum Express

Enjoy a 60 minute long guided tour of the Colosseum and then explore on your own the amazing archeological area of the Colosseum.

Day Tour of Villa D'Este & Hadrian's Villa Tivoli

Marvel at the opulence of Hadrian's Villa and the gardens of Villa D'Este in Tivoli on a 7-hour tour from Rome. Stroll the gardens of the Borgias, and see the imperial palaces of Emperor Hadrian to discover 2 of the finest Renaissance residences in Italy.

Private Tour of Rome by Golf Cart

Rome is like an open-air museum with countless things to see and places to visit. Take a tour by golf cart and explore all of the city's most famous sights. There's also time to go shopping at Campo de Fiori or explore the Vatican with your guide.

ROME(ROMA) Guide

The Colosseum Rome(Italian and Latin:Roma), the 'Eternal City', is the capital and largest city of Italy and of the Lazio (Latium) region. It's the famed city of theRoman Empire, theSeven Hills, La Dolce Vita(sweet life), the Vatican City andThree Coins in the Fountain. Rome, as a millennium-long centre of power, culture and religion, having been the centre of one of the globe's greatest civilizations ever, has exerted a huge influence over the world in its circa 2500 years of existence.

The historic centre of the city is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. With wonderful palaces, millennium-old churches and basilicas, grand romantic ruins, opulent monuments, ornate statues and graceful fountains, Rome has an immensely rich historical heritage and cosmopolitan atmosphere, making it one of Europe's and the world's most visited, famous, influential and beautiful capitals. Today, Rome has a growing nightlife scene and is also seen as a shopping heaven, being regarded as one of the fashion capitals of the world (some of Italy's oldest jewellery and clothing establishments were founded in the city). With so many sights and things to do, Rome can truly be classified a "global city".

Rome can be divided into several districts. The so-called historical centre (centro storico) is quite small, being only around 4% of the city's area. This mainly consists of the area inside the Aurelian walls, and is protected by UNESCO. Districts are explained below:

The PantheonSituated on the River Tiber, between the Apennine Mountains and the Tyrrhenian Sea, the "Eternal City" was once the administrative centre of the mighty Roman Empire, governing a vast region that stretched all the way from Britain to Mesopotamia. Today it remains the seat of the Italian government and home to numerous ministerial offices. Rome has 2.7 million inhabitants while the metropolitan area is home to around 4.5 million.

Architecturally and culturally, Rome has some contrasts - you have areas with pompously huge majestic palaces, avenues and basilicas, which are then surrounded by tiny alleyways, little churches and old houses. The centre of Rome is mainly ancient, and modern buildings are usually concentrated in the suburbs, unlikeMilan(where new and old architecture is combined both in the centre and the outskirts). You may also find yourself walking from a grand palace and tree-lined elegant boulevard, into a small and cramped Medieval-like street.

The abbreviation "S.P.Q.R" is ubiquitous in Rome, short for the old democratic motto "Senatus Populusque Romanus" (Latin), i.e. "The Roman Senate and People".

For two weeks in August, many of Rome's inhabitants shut up shop (literally) and go on their own vacations; many stores, restaurants and other amenities will beclosedduring this time. The temperature in the city centre at this time of year is not particularly pleasant. If you do travel to Rome at this time, be prepared to seeChiuso per ferie(Closed for holidays) signs on many establishments. Even in these weeks the city is very beautiful and if you are looking for a less overcrowded vacation in Rome, this is not a bad time. You will always be able to find somewhere to eat.

Roman Forum The artsy Piazza Navona. The Vittorio Emanuele monument, considered a symbol of modern post-Risorgimento Rome. The Quirinal Palace, the official residence of the President of Italy.

Rome's history spans over two and half thousand years, which have seen its transformation from a small Latin village to the centre of a vast empire, through the founding of Catholicism, and into the capital of today's Italy. Rome's history is long and complex. What follows is merely a quick summary.

Rome is traditionally thought to have been founded by the mythical twins Romulus and Remus, who were abandoned as infants in the Tiber River and raised by a mother wolf before being found by a shepherd who raised them as his own sons. Rome was founded as a small village sometime in the 8th century BC surrounding thePalatine Hill, including the area where theRoman Forumis found. Due to the village's position at a ford on the Tiber River, Rome became a crossroads of traffic and trade.

The settlement developed into the capital of the Roman Kingdom, led by a series of Etruscan kings, before becoming the seat of the Roman Republic at around 500 BC, and then the centre of theRoman Empirefrom 27 BC on. For almost a thousand years, Rome was the largest, wealthiest, most powerful city in the Western World, with dominance over most of Europe and the Mediterranean Sea. Even after the fall of the Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, Rome maintained considerable importance and wealth.

Beginning with the reign of Constantine I, the Bishop of Rome (later known as the Pope) gained political and religious importance, establishing Rome as the centre of the Catholic Church. During the Early Middle Ages, the city declined in population but gained a new importance as the capital of the newly formed Papal States. Throughout the Middle Ages, Rome was a major pilgrimage site and the focus of struggles between the Holy Roman Empire and the Papacy.The Santa Maria in Trastevere church, a symbol of early medieval Rome.

With the Italian Renaissance fully under way in the 15th century, Rome changed dramatically. Extravagant churches, bridges, and public spaces, including a new Saint Peter's Basilica and theSistine Chapel, were constructed by the Papacy so that Rome would equal the grandeur of other Italian cities of the period. As the Grand Tour became customary for young European gentlemen in the 17th century, Rome became an important tourist destination, and remains as such until today.

In the 19th century, Rome again became the focus of a power struggle with the rise of the Kingdom of Italy, which wished to see a reunification of Italy. The Papal States remained in control of Rome under French protection, but with the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, French troops were forced to abandon Rome, leaving it clear for the Kingdom of Italy to capture. Rome became the capital of Italy, and has remained such ever since.

Rome today is a contemporary metropolis that reflects the many periods of its long history - Ancient times, Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Modern Era. With the rise of Italian Fascism following World War I, Rome's population grew. This trend was stopped by World War II, which dealt relatively minor damage to Rome. With the dismantlement of the monarchy and the creation of the Italian Republic following WWII, Rome again began to grow in population and became a modern city. The city stands today as the capital of Italy and one of the world's major tourist destinations.

Rome has a Mediterranean climate, with hot, dry summers and mild, wet winters. In the winter months, daytime temperatures are usually pleasant and range from 10-15 °C, while nighttime temperatures tend to stay slightly above freezing. That being said, the occasional cold snap can cause temperatures to fall below freezing, and it is not unheard of for light flurries of snow to fall on occasion, though accumulation is rare, and major snowstorms are known to occur once every 20-25 years.

At last count there were close to 1700 novels set in Rome in days gone by. Most easily available in bookshops are those byLindsey DavisandSteven Saylor. Both are good storytellers and excellent at portraying life in Ancient Rome. Particularly interesting if you are visiting Rome may be Saylor’sRoma: The Novel of Ancient Rome, which traces the first thousand years or so of Rome’s history by following the fictional fortunes of two families. Each chapter begins with a map showing the state of Rome’s development at the time of the chapter.

The classic work on Ancient Rome remains Edward Gibbon’sHistory of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. This was written in 1782 but is still being reprinted. A marvelous book that covers Rome’s fortunes from Romulus and Remus to the 1970s isRome: The Biography of a Cityby Christopher Hibbert (Penguin). An excellent guide book, too, although perhaps a bit too heavy to carry around.Romeby Robert Hughes (Orion Books) concentrates on the city's art history and provides fascinating insights into the things you will see while walking around.SPQR, written by Cambridge University professor and British TV personality Mary Beard, and published in 2015, offers a detailed analysis of Rome's first 1000 years and attempts to answer why Rome expanded from a small village on the Tiber to the centre of a major empire.

English-language bookshops in Rome are:

  • The Lion Bookshop, Via dei Greci, 36, close to Piazza di Spagna. Lots of books and a small cafe.
  • Anglo-American Bookstore, Via delle Vite, 102, also close toPiazza di Spagna. A large store, with specialist sections. Strong on non-fiction.
  • TheAlmost Corner Bookshop, Via del Moro 45, Trastevere. Small but very well-stocked store on the other side of the river. Some Italian bookstores also have English-language sections. Try the large selection of English books (but also French, Spanish and more) atFeltrinelli Internationalin viaVittorio EmanueleOrlando - or the smaller selection at its store in Largo Argentina.

Campidoglio Rome

Italians are very fond of their landmarks; in order to make them accessible to everyone one week a year there is no charge for admittance to all publicly owned landmarks and historical sites. This week, known as "La settimana dei beni culturali", typically occurs in mid-May and for those 7 to 10 days every landmark, archaeological site and museum belonging to government agencies (including the Quirinale presidential palace and gardens, the Colosseum and all of the ancient Forum) is accessible and free of charge. For more information and for specific dates see or .

Government-owned museums and historical sites havefree admissionon the first Sunday of every month.

Castel Sant'Angelo and angel figure

If you'll be staying in Rome for at least 3 days, consider purchasing theRoma Pass. It is valid for 3 days and costs €38.50. It entitles holders to free admission to the first two museums and/or archaeological sites visited, full access to the public transport system, and discounts for the other museums, tourist sites, exhibitions, music events, theatrical and dance performances. This pass gets you in to the Colosseum (Colosseo),Palatine Hill(Palatino Hill), theBaths of Caracalla(Terme di Caracalla), and the catacombs as well as the Terme di Diocleziano, Palazza Massimo alle Terme,Crypta Balbi, Palazzo Altemps, Villa dei Quintili, and the Tomb ofCecilia Metella.

A Roma Pass 48-hoursis also offered for €28 and is valid for 2 days. For this pass only the first museum and/or archaeological sites visited is free.

Check the expiration date at the back of the Roma Pass card. If the card's validity has expired it does not work in the metro's ticket gate. Be sure to buy the passes at official tourist offices. There are also small booths on the streets that sell tickets, but they could charge you a higher price.

Another advantage of the Roma Pass is that you can often skip the waiting queues if it's one of your first two free entrances. This way you can avoid, for example, a 1+ hour waiting time at the Colosseum.

There's an alternative pass calledOMNIA Vatican and Romethat includes the services provided by Roma Pass, free entry toVatican MuseumsandSistine Chapel, fast track entry to St Peter's Basilica and hop-on-hop-off bus tour for 3 days. It costs 113 euros for 3 days

Coffers and Oculus of the Pantheon

The main area for exploring the ruins of ancient Rome is in Rome/Colosseo either side ofVia dei Fori Imperiali, which connects the Colosseum andPiazza Venezia. Constructed between 1931 and 1933, at the time of Mussolini, this road destroyed a large area of Renaissance and medieval buildings constructed on top of ruins of the ancient forums and ended forever plans for an archeological park stretching all the way to the Appian Way. Heading towards the Colosseum fromPiazza Venezia, you see theRoman Forumon your right and Trajan's Forum and Market on the left. To the right of the Colosseum is theArch of Constantineand the beginning of thePalatine Hill, which will eventually lead you to ruins of theFlavian Palaceand a view of theCircus Maximus(see Rome/Aventino-Testaccio). To the left, after the Colosseum is a wide, tree-lined path that climbs through theColle Oppiopark. Underneath this park is the Golden House of Nero (Domus Aurea), an enormous and spectacular underground complex restored and then closed again due to damage caused by heavy rain. Further to the left on theEsquiline Hillare ruins of Trajan's baths.

In Old Rome you must see the Pantheon, which is amazingly well preserved considering it dates back to 125 AD. There is a hole constructed in the ceiling so it is an interesting experience to be there when it is raining. If you are heading to the Pantheon fromPiazza Veneziayou first reachLargo di Torre Argentinaon your left. Until 1926 this was covered in narrow streets and small houses, which were razed to the ground when ruins of Roman temples were discovered. Moving along Corso Vittorio Emmanuelle and crossing the Tiber river into the Vatican area you see the imposing Castel Sant' Angelo, built as a Mausoleum for the Emperor Hadrian. This is connected by a covered fortified corridor to the Vatican and served as a refuge for Popes in times of trouble.

South of the Colosseum are theBaths of Caracalla(Aventino-Testaccio). You can then head South-East on the old Appian Way, passing through a stretch of very well-preserved city wall. For the adventurous, continuing along the Appian Way (Rome/South) will bring you to a whole host of Roman ruins, including theCircus of Maxentius, the tomb ofCecilia Metella, theVilla dei Quintiliand, nearby, several long stretches of Roman aqueduct.

Returning to the Modern Centre, theBaths of Diocletianare opposite the entrance to the main railway station, Termini. The National Museum of Rome stands in the South-West corner of the Baths complex and has an enormous collection of Roman sculptures and other artefacts. But this is just one of numerous museums devoted to ancient Rome, including those of theCapitoline Hill. It is really amazing how much there is.

The Renaissance/Baroque opulent exterior of St. Peter's Basilica

There are more than 900 churches in Rome; probably one third would be well worth a visit!

In Catholic tradition, St. Peter is said to have founded the church in Rome together with St. Paul. The first churches of Rome originated in places where early Christians met, usually in the homes of private citizens. By the IVth Century, however, there were already four major churches, or basilicas. Rome had 28 cardinals who took it in turns to give mass once a week in one of the basilicas. In one form or another the four basilicas are with us today and constitute the major churches of Rome. They are St Peter’s, St Paul’s Outside the Walls, Santa Maria Maggiore and San Giovanni. All pilgrims to Rome are expected to visit these four basilicas, together with San Lorenzo fuori le mura, Santa Croce in Gerusalemme, and the Sanctuary of Divino Amore. The latter was inserted as one of the seven at the time of the Great Jubilee in 2000, replacing San Sebastiano outside the walls.

Take a look inside a few churches. You'll find the richness and range of decor astonishing, from fine classical art to tacky electric candles. Starting with several good examples of early Christian churches, including San Clemente and Santa Costanza, there are churches built over a period of 1700 years or so, including modern churches constructed to serve Rome's new suburbs.

Some churches in Rome deny admission to people who are dressed inappropriately. You will find "fashion police" at the most visited churches. ("Knees and shoulders" are the main problem - especially female ones.) Bare shoulders, short skirts, and shorts are officially not allowed, but long shorts and skirts reaching just above the knee should generally be no problem. However, it's always safer to wear longer pants or skirts that go below the knee; St. Peter's in particular is known for rejecting tourists for uncovered knees, shoulders, midriffs, etc. (You also generally won't be told until right before you enter the church, so you will have made the trek to the Vatican and stood in a long security line for nothing.) The stricter churches usually have vendors just outside selling inexpensive scarves and sometimes plastic pants. But relatively few churches enforce dress codes and you can wander into most wearing shorts, sleeveless shirts, or pretty much anything without problems. It is, however, good to keep one's dress tasteful, as these are still churches and houses of prayer for many people. (Older Romans might comment on your attire and perhaps harass you if it is particularly revealing.)

To the modern visitor, theSeven Hillsof Rome can be rather difficult to identify. In the first place generations of buildings constructed on top of each other and the construction of tall buildings in the valleys have tended to make the hills less pronounced than they originally were. Secondly, there are clearly more than seven hills. In Roman days many of these were outside the city boundaries.

The seven hills were first occupied by small settlements and not recognised as a city for some time. Rome came into being as these settlements acted together to drain the marshy valleys between them and turn them into markets and fora. The Roman Forum used to be a swamp.

ThePalatine Hilllooms over Circus Maximus and is accessed near the Colosseum . Legend has it that this was occupied by Romulus when he fell out with his brother, Remus, who occupied the Aventine Hill on the other side of the Circus. Also clearly recognisable as hills are the Caelian, to the southeast ofCircus Maximusand the Capitoline, which overlooks the Forum and now hosts the Municipality of Rome. East and northeast of theRoman Forumare the Esquiline, Viminal, and Quirinal hills. These are less easy to distinguish as separate hills these days and from a distance look like one.The Servian Wall outside Termini StationThe red line on the map indicates theServian Wall, its construction is credited to the Roman King Servius Tullius in the Sixth Century BC, but archaeological evidence places its construction during the Fourth Century BC. Small bits of this wall can still be seen, particularly close to Termini railway station and on the Aventine hill. As Rome expanded new walls were required to protect the larger area. These were built in the Third Century AD by the Emperor Aurelian. Lengthy sections of this wall remain all around the outskirts of Rome's centre. Much is in very good condition.

Among other hills of Rome, not included in the seven, are that overlooking the Vatican; the Janiculum overlooking Trastevere, which provides excellent views of Rome; the Pincio on the edge of the Borghese Gardens, which gives good views of the Vatican, and theMonte Marioto the north.

If you are in Rome for theArtsthere are several world-class museums in the city. The natural starting point is a visit to the area ofVilla Borghesein Rome/North Center, where there is a cluster of art museums in and around the Borghese Gardens.Galleria Borghesehouses a previously private art collection of the Borghese family,Museo Nazionale diVilla Giuliais home of the world's largest Etruscan art collection, andGalleria Nazionale d'Arte Modernahouses many Italian masterpieces as well as a few pieces by artists such as Cézanne, Degas, Monet andVan Gogh.

TheCapitoline Museumsin the Colosseo district opens their doors to the city's most important collection of antique Roman and Greek art and sculptures. Visit theGalleria d'Arte Antica, housed in the Barberini palace in the Modern centre, for Italian Renaissance and Baroque art.

A visit to Rome is not complete without a trip to the Vatican Museum. You need to go to the museum if you want to see theSistine Chapel, but there is an enormous collection. You cannot miss part of this, such as tapestries, maps and the rooms painted by Rafael, as they are en route to theSistine Chapel, but there is much, much more to explore, including a stunning Egyptian collection, and the Pinacoteca, which includes a Portrait of St. Jerome by Leonardo da Vinci and paintings by Giotto, Perugino, Raphael, Veronese, Caravaggio, and others.

Rome'sNational Museum at theBaths of Diocletianin the Modern Centre has a vast archaeological collection as does the national museum atPalazzo Altemps, close to Piazza Navona. Further afield, theMuseo di Civilta Romana(Museum of Rome's Civilization), in EUR is most famous for an enormous model of Imperial Rome, but also has an extensive display of plaster casts, models and reconstructions of statues and Roman stonework.

If you have plenty of time there is absolutely no shortage of other museums covering a wide variety of interests. Examples include theMuseum of the Walls(see Rome/South), theMusical Instrument Museumand a museum devoted to the liberation of Rome from German occupation in the Second World War (Rome/Esquilino-San Giovanni).

Check museum opening hours before heading there. Government museums are invariably closed on Mondays, so that is a good day for other activities. The Rome municipality itself operates some 17 museums and attractions. Info atMusei In Comune Roma. These are free to European Union citizens under 18 and over 65. Websites for other museums are listed on the relevant District pages.

The lovely Piazza della Repubblica.Much of the attraction of Rome is in just wandering around the old city. You can quickly escape from the major tourist routes and feel as if you are in a small medieval village, not a capital city. If you can do so while watching for uneven cobblestones, keep looking upwards. There are some amazing roof gardens and all sorts of sculptures, paintings and religious icons attached to exterior walls. Look through 2nd and 3rd floor windows to see some oak-beamed ceilings in the old houses. Look through the archway entrances of larger Palazzos to see incredible courtyards, complete with sculptures, fountains and gardens. Take a stroll in the area betweenPiazza Navonaand theTiberriver in Old Rome where artisans continue to ply their trade from small shops. Also in Old Rome, take a 1 km stroll downVia Giulia, which is lined with many old palaces. Film enthusiasts will want to visitVia Veneto(ViaVittorio Veneto) in the Modern Centre, scene for much of Fellini'sLa Dolce Vita.

The narrow streets frequently broaden out into small or large squares (piazzas), which usually have one or more churches and a fountain or two. Apart fromPiazza NavonaandPiazza della Rotonda(in front of the Pantheon), take in the nearbyPiazza della Minerva, with its unique elephant statue by Bernini andPiazza Colonnawith the column of Marcus Aurelius andPalazzo Chigi, meeting place of the Italian Government. On the other side of CorsoVittorio EmanuelearePiazza Farnesewith the Palazzo of the same name (now the French Embassy) and two interesting fountains and the flower sellers atCampo dei Fiori, scene of Rome's executions in the old days. All of these squares are a short distance from each other in Old Rome. The enormousPiazza del Popoloin the North Centre, which provided an imposing entrance to the city when it represented the northern boundary of Rome, is well worth a visit. A short walk back towards the centre brings you toPiazza di Spagnaat the foot of theSpanish Steps. Yet another fascinating fountain here. The area was much used as backdrop for the 1953 filmRoman Holidaywith Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck.Piazza NavonaOn the other side of the river is, of course, the magnificent square ofSt Peter'sat the Vatican. Further south, in Trastevere isPiazzaSanta Maria in Trastevere, a great place to watch the world go by, either from one of the restaurants or bars that line two sides of the square or, if that is too expensive, from the steps of the central fountain. The square attracts many street entertainers.

Moving back to the Modern Centre you have to see theTrevi Fountain, surely a part of everyone's Roman holiday. Visitors are always amazed that such a big and famous fountain is tucked away in a small piazza in the middle of side streets. Take extra-special care of your possessions here. Further up the Via del Tritone you will come toPiazza Barberini, now full of traffic but the lovely Bernini fountain is not to be missed.

EUR provides a selection of Fascist Architecture, including thePalazzo della Civiltà Italiana, often referred to "the Square Colosseum." It was designed to honour the historic Colosseum. This would be an interesting place to visit after seeing the Colosseum to compare their differences and similarities.

On the Pincio above Piazza del Popolo is a good viewpoint.With no tall buildings in Rome, views of the city come from climbing the many hills, either the original seven hills of Rome or others that surround them. The two most popular views of Rome are from theJaniculumhill overlooking Trastevere and thePincioat the edge of the Borghese Gardens. The former, best reached by car, has sweeping views of the centre of Rome, as long as the authorities remember to prune the trees on the hillside in front of the viewpoint. Cross over the piazza for an excellent view of the dome ofSt Peter's. The Vatican is the main sight from the Pincio (metro Line A,Piazza del Popolo, and then a good climb). Less popular, but just as nice, is the orange grove at Parco Savello on the Aventine Hill. Even less popular among tourists, as it is better accessed by car or moped, it the small square in front of the Zodiaco Restaurant inMonte Mario, a very popular spot for young Roman couples.

If you are planning some serious sightseeing then leave the kids with their grandparents! They don’t take kindly to being dragged from ruin to ruin and church to church. A common sight in Rome is miserable looking kids traipsing after their parents. Also, push chairs/buggies are difficult to use because of the cobbled streets. If you are a family, do not try to do too much. It will be a big strain on kids and in the end everyone will be tired.

Apart from the major attractions Rome has relatively little to entertain kids. If you noticed a big Ferris wheel on your way in from Fiumicino Airport, think again. Lunapark at EUR was closed down in 2008. A few of the other ways to bribe your kids, however, are:

  • Children's Museum. Via Flaminia 82. Just north ofPiazza del Popolo. Controlled entrance at 10.00, 12,00, 15.00 and 17.00 for visits lasting 1 hour 45 minutes. Closed Mondays and for much of August. Best to check the web site for up-to-date info and to book in advance. Hands-on science, mainly for pre-teens, housed in a former tram-car depot.
  • Bioparco. The renamed Rome Zoo. On the edge of the Borghese Gardens (North Centre).
  • TheTime Elevator. Via deiSanti Apostoli, 20 on a side street betweenPiazza Veneziaand theTrevi Fountain. Daily 10.30 to 19.30. "Five-dimensional" shows on the Origins of Life and on the History of Rome, plus "The House of Horrors". Not for the faint-hearted: your seats move all over the place. Kids love it.
  • Rome'sWax Museum. 67 Piazza diSanti Apostoli, next toPiazza Venezia. Few good reports about this museum. Comments invited.
  • Planetarium. This also has an excellent astronomy museum and is conveniently next to the Museum of Rome's Civilization (EUR).
  • The Vaticanis, by and large, not a great idea for kids although they often enjoy theSistine Chapeland are impressed by the beauty and the fact that it was all done in just four years. However, theSistine Chapelis very crowded and getting there through the corridors of the Vatican Museum is even worse. It is easy for families to get separated so determine a meeting point. The best part ofSt. Peter's Basilicais that kids can go to the top of the dome. It is 500 steps but you can take the elevator up to the third floor. From there there are another 323 exhausting steps. So it is fun for older kids who can both climb up all the stairs and walk down as there is a huge line for the elevator (Vatican).
  • Zoomarine. Dolphins, sea lions, exotic birds, splashy rides and swimming pools, some 20 km south of Rome near Pomezia. A good day out, but is this really why you came to Rome? Free transport from EUR and Pomezia railway station. Check web site for details.

Children's Museum. Via Flaminia 82. Just north of Piazza del Popolo. Controlled entrance at 10.00, 12,00, 15.00 and 17.00 for visits lasting 1 hour 45 minutes. Closed Mondays and for much of August. Best to check the web site for up-to-date info and to book in advance. Hands-on science, mainly for pre-teens, housed in a former tram-car depot.

Bioparco. The renamed Rome Zoo. On the edge of the Borghese Gardens ([[Rome/North_Center|North Centre]]).

The Time Elevator. Via dei Santi Apostoli, 20 on a side street between Piazza Venezia and the Trevi Fountain. Daily 10.30 to 19.30. "Five-dimensional" shows on the Origins of Life and on the History of Rome, plus "The House of Horrors". Not for the faint-hearted: your seats move all over the place. Kids love it.

Rome's Wax Museum. 67 Piazza di Santi Apostoli, next to Piazza Venezia. Few good reports about this museum. Comments invited.

Planetarium. This also has an excellent astronomy museum and is conveniently next to the Museum of Rome's Civilization ([[Rome/South|EUR]]).

The Vaticanis, by and large, not a great idea for kids although they often enjoy the Sistine Chapel and are impressed by the beauty and the fact that it was all done in just four years. However, the Sistine Chapel is very crowded and getting there through the corridors of the Vatican Museum is even worse. It is easy for families to get separated so determine a meeting point. The best part of St. Peter's Basilica is that kids can go to the top of the dome. It is 500 steps but you can take the elevator up to the third floor. From there there are another 323 exhausting steps. So it is fun for older kids who can both climb up all the stairs and walk down as there is a huge line for the elevator ([[Rome/Vatican|Vatican]]).

Zoomarine. Dolphins, sea lions, exotic birds, splashy rides and swimming pools, some 20 km south of Rome near Pomezia. A good day out, but is this really why you came to Rome? Free transport from EUR and Pomezia railway station. Check web site for details.

  • Take in a show. There are lots of theatres, but you will need to know Italian to enjoy them. The main concert venue is theAuditoriumin Viale Pietro de Coubertin to the north of Rome. The Auditorium atParco della Musicais a large complex composed of three separate halls whose shapes are inspired by musical instruments. These are positioned around anopen airamphitheatre, that is used nearly every night in the summer for concerts. TheParco della Musicahosts a constant stream of classical, popular, and jazz music, featuring national as well as international musicians and groups. Really big names perform outdoors in the summer; usually in either the Olympic Stadium or inStadio Flaminio, which is next door to theParco della Musica. In winter the Palalotto in EUR is an important pop concert venue.
    To get full details of what is on, buy a copy of theLa Repubblicanewspaper on Thursdays, when it has an insert calledTrovaRoma. There are a couple of pages in English but even with no Italian you should be able to decipher the main listings. This is not published in late July and August, when half of Rome heads to the beach. BothLa RepubblicaandIl Messaggerohave daily listings.
  • Walk and feel the energy of Rome; sights are everywhere waiting to be discovered.
  • Walk or cycle along the banks of the Tiber. There are steps down to the river from close to most of the bridges. A few have special runners for cycle wheels. This gets you away from the traffic fumes and gives a different perspective of Rome. Not usually possible in winter when water levels can be very high.
  • Explore the Trastevere neighbourhood for some great cafes and trattorie, and a glimpse at a hip Roman neighbourhood.
  • Watch footballie soccer. The city has two teams playing in Serie A, the top tier of Italian football, AS Roma and SS Lazio. They share theStadio Olimpico, capacity 70,000, in the north of the city. Matches between the two teams are known as theDerby della Capitale, and are extremely charged affairs, with crowd violence being a regular occurrence, sometimes even resulting in fatal stabbings. The city will host matches at the upcoming Euro 2020 tournament.

  • Estate Romana Festival. From late June through early September offers various musical events of jazz, rock, and classical music, and film, sport, theater and children’s fun.
  • White Night (Notte Bianca). In early to mid-September, various events until dawn, plus shops and restaurants, museums stay open while the Roman Notte Bianca stages music, dance and theater events. Expect enormous crowds; buses and trams will be packed to the brim.
  • Opera at Caracalla, Baths of Caracalla(see Rome/Aventino-Testaccio). If you are in Rome during summertime don’t miss the chance to experience a lyric opera in the truly unique setting of the Caracalla Baths. The 2009 program included Tosca, Carmen and Midsummer Night’s Dream. Performances start at 21.00.
  • Festa dell'Unità. This is a traditional popular festival, once organised by the Italian Communist Party to promote its official newspaper l'Unità ("Unity"), and nowadays kept by the Democratic Party. Held annually in mid-June in Rome's archaeological area, the festival has built a reputation for the great quality food stalls where people can taste for free or at low-price, a good variety of Italian food and wine. The event includes live music, cultural and literary meetings.

Estate Romana Festival. From late June through early September offers various musical events of jazz, rock, and classical music, and film, sport, theater and children’s fun.

White Night (Notte Bianca). In early to mid-September, various events until dawn, plus shops and restaurants, museums stay open while the Roman Notte Bianca stages music, dance and theater events. Expect enormous crowds; buses and trams will be packed to the brim.

Opera at Caracalla, Baths of Caracalla (see Rome/Aventino-Testaccio). If you are in Rome during summertime don’t miss the chance to experience a lyric opera in the truly unique setting of the Caracalla Baths. The 2009 program included Tosca, Carmen and Midsummer Night’s Dream. Performances start at 21.00.

Festa dell'Unità. This is a traditional popular festival, once organised by the Italian Communist Party to promote its official newspaper l'Unità ("Unity"), and nowadays kept by the Democratic Party. Held annually in mid-June in Rome's archaeological area, the festival has built a reputation for the great quality food stalls where people can taste for free or at low-price, a good variety of Italian food and wine. The event includes live music, cultural and literary meetings.

Take in a show. There are lots of theatres, but you will need to know Italian to enjoy them. The main concert venue is theAuditoriumin Viale Pietro de Coubertin [[Rome/North Center|to the north of Rome]]. The Auditorium at Parco della Musica is a large complex composed of three separate halls whose shapes are inspired by musical instruments. These are positioned around an open air amphitheatre, that is used nearly every night in the summer for concerts. The Parco della Musica hosts a constant stream of classical, popular, and jazz music, featuring national as well as international musicians and groups. Really big names perform outdoors in the summer; usually in either the [[Rome/North|Olympic Stadium]] or in Stadio Flaminio, which is next door to the Parco della Musica. In winter the Palalotto in [[Rome/South|EUR]] is an important pop concert venue.

To get full details of what is on, buy a copy of theLa Repubblicanewspaper on Thursdays, when it has an insert calledTrovaRoma. There are a couple of pages in English but even with no Italian you should be able to decipher the main listings. This is not published in late July and August, when half of Rome heads to the beach. BothLa RepubblicaandIl Messaggerohave daily listings.

Watch footballie soccer. The city has two teams playing in Serie A, the top tier of Italian football, AS Roma and SS Lazio. They share the Stadio Olimpico, capacity 70,000, in the north of the city. Matches between the two teams are known as theDerby della Capitale, and are extremely charged affairs, with crowd violence being a regular occurrence, sometimes even resulting in fatal stabbings. The city will host matches at the upcoming [[Euro 2020]] tournament.

In Rome, obviously, the population speaksItalian. The road signs are mostly in Italian (except for "STOP"). If you are staying in the city there are plenty of English alternatives to be found. Seeing as Rome is a popular place to visit there are maps and information in many languages available. Police officers and transit drivers are more than willing to help you get around and usually provide easier ways to get around.

Some residents still speak the ancient local dialect,Romanesco; nowadays, however, Italian is the more common mother tongue.

Englishis widely spoken in Rome by the younger generations and by people working in the tourist industry. Since many people have a limited knowledge of English, it is wise to speak slowly and simply. Among 40+s the chance is a lot less, and with 60+s as good as zero.

Romance languagesother than Italian, especially Spanish, Portuguese and French, are also fairly widely understood due to their similarity to Italian, although not necessarily spoken.

Snapshot of a Roman marketRome has excellent shopping opportunities of all kinds - from clothing and jewellery to art and antiques. You also get some big department stores, outlets and shopping centres, notably in the suburbs and outskirts.

Mainshopping areasincludeVia del Corso, Via Condotti, and the surrounding streets. The finest designer stores are aroundVia Condotti, whilstVia del Corsohas more affordable clothing, and ViaCola di Rienzo, and the surroundings of Via del Tritone, Campo de'Fiori, and Pantheon are the places to go for cheaper items. Upim is a good shop for cheap clothing of workable quality. Some brands (like Miss Sixty and Furla) are excellent, some are not as good - be sure to feel garments and try them on. There are also great quality shoes and leather bags at prices that compare well with the UK and US. Clothes in sizes bigger than a UK size 16/US 12 aren't always easy to find. Children's clothing can be expensive with basic vests (tank tops) costing as much as €21 in non-designer shops. If you really need to buy clothiers for kids try theOviessechain. Summer sales in many stores begin around July 15 and Rome also has New Year sales.

As mentioned above,Via Condottiis Rome's top haute couture fashion street (equivalent of Fifth Avenue in New York City, Via Montenapoleone in Milan, or Bond Street in London). Here, you can find big brand names such as Gucci, Armani, Dior, Valentino and Hermès, and several other high-class shops. However, the streets around theVia Condotti, such asVia Frattina, Via del Babuino, Via Borgognonaand thePiazza di Spagnaalso offer some excellent high fashion boutiques, including Roberto Cavalli,Dolce & Gabbana, Versace, Prada and Givenchy (and several others). So once in the city, the big boutique names aren't absent. In these luxurious streets, however, you needn't only do clothing shopping - there are some really good and funky jewellery (e.g. Bulgari, Cartier, Tiffany's & Co.), pen and accessory (i.e. Mont Blanc) and artsy stores peppered here and there in these streets.

If you want to spend a day in alarge shopping mall, there's the Euroma2 with about 230 shops (mainly clothes and accessories) and restaurants, to be found near the EUR district. Take Metro B line from Termini toEUR Palasportstation, cross the road and take the frequent free bus (ride takes 5–15 minutes) to the mall. In addition to many shops and food, the conditioned air and free toilets may be a welcome relief if you are in Rome during mid-summer.

There are lots of fake plastic 'Louis Vuitton' bags being sold at the side of the road. Be aware, that buying of fake products is illegal in Italy. Fines up to €1000 have been reported. If you are happy to take the risk, make sure you haggle; unsuspecting tourists pay up to €60 for them.

If you want to buy souvenirs or gifts, a museum would be the worst choice since there are many stalls along the streets of touristic areas that offer reasonable prices. It is likely that the same item in the gift shop of any museum will cost much more.

  • Castel Romano. Near Rome, along theVia Pontinahighway. A very large Factory Outlet with more than 100 branded shops. A car is needed to reach the place but a 30% discount in a designer shop is surely worth the 20 km trip.
  • Valmontone. A little further away from Rome than Castel Romano, you can find Valmontone outlet on the motorway towards Napoli just 50 km far from Rome. Valmontone itself is a delightful little town - 30 mins by train.

Castel Romano. Near Rome, along the Via Pontina highway. A very large Factory Outlet with more than 100 branded shops. A car is needed to reach the place but a 30% discount in a designer shop is surely worth the 20 km trip.

Valmontone. A little further away from Rome than Castel Romano, you can find Valmontone outlet on the motorway towards Napoli just 50 km far from Rome. Valmontone itself is a delightful little town - 30 mins by train.

Rome is full of good restaurants, many in attractive settings, particularly when you sit outside in the evening. No one location can be recommended to search for a good restaurant: some of the best places to eat are in the most unpromising locations while well-situated restaurants can often live on their reputation rather than the quality of their food. Restaurants in guidebooks can be good but prices can be inflated because it is more than likely a "tourist trap". To find an authentic restaurant that won't break the bank, try to find a place in a more residential area or somewhere that isn't in the middle of the tourist locations.

Many of the good restaurants in Rome are hard to find, but a good tip is to go where Italians live and eat. On the top of the green, old mountain (Monte Verde Vecchio) there are some trattorias with authentic Italian cuisine at an affordable price. Rome also has many beautiful spots to eat, so buying some delicacies to make up a picnic can be a great experience. In Via Marmorata you find Volpetti's which is known for its amazing selection of cheese, prosciutto and delicious pastries (and also for its prices!). A more affordable choice is to go to a local supermarket which will also have good fresh foods for lunch.

Most pizza restaurants serve it only in the evening. Try some of the fried things like baccala (battered salt cod) for a starter, followed by a pizza for a really Roman meal. Roman pizzas tend to be very thin crusted. Avoid the tourist areas where you'll often pay double the going rate just to get a badly reheated frozen pizza. Your best bet is to cross the river and find a restaurant in Trastevere--the food is authentic and a lot cheaper than in the rest of downtown Rome. Make sure you eat it with a fork and knife; Romans don't eat this kind of pizza with their hands.

Pizza al Taglio is pizza with a thicker crust, cooked in a large pan. This is served by the piece, usually to take away, and is a good cheap way to get something to fill you up. Point to the one you want, indicate if you want more or less than your server is indicating with the knife. It's sold by weight (the listed price is usually per 100 g, known as anetto, short forettogrammo, i.e. hectogramm). This kind of pizza is eaten with the slices stacked on top of each other like a sandwich.

Look for agelateria. Remember that it usually costs extra to sit inside. You pay for your ice cream first...take your receipt and go fight your way through the throng to choose your flavors (Italians don't believe in lines). You will be asked "Panna?" when it's almost made - this is the offer of whipped cream on top. If you've already paid, this is free.

There are a few signs to keep in mind: "Produzione Propria" (homemade - our own production), "Nostra Produzione" (our production), "Produzione Artigianale" (production by craftsmen). If the colours seem dull and almost ugly it is probably natural, the bright colours being just a mix. Keep in mind, Italians usually won't queue, but if they are in line for gelato, get in line yourself: you may have hit the jackpot. Producers to try includeGelato di San Crispino; Giolitti; andFassi.

Vegetarians should have an easy time. Buffets in many restaurants usually have a good range of delicious vegetarian stuff - e.g. gratinated roast peppers/aubergines, etc.Vegansshould do all right too; pizzas don't always have cheese - a Marinara for example, is just tomato, garlic and oregano.

While there is not much choice, at least Rome's Kosher cooking is truly excellent. TryLa Taverna del Ghettoin the heart of the Jewish Quarter.

More places can be found near the synagogue in via Padova, close to the "La Sapienza" university and the Bologna underground station.

You can get cheap food in Rome, the problem is that if you don't know the city well or are forced to eat out in the centre, the prices go up.

  • €3.50- You buy the pizza and eat it walking around, since it's a bread shop with no sitting area. You can choose how much you want to eat, but you'll be spending about €2 per slice + about €1.50 for a can of soda or €1 for water.
  • €15-20- At lunchtime if you go to a restaurant you'll be spending between €15 for a set menu (not always good, try to go where you see Italian office people having their lunch as your best bet) and €20. For this you should get a pasta dish and a second course (meat) ending with coffee. Obviously if you have special wine the price will increase.
  • €20- At night you can spend about €20 at a pizza restaurant or if you have only one main course. Again, if you have special wine it will cost more. The cheapest food you can get at a decent restaurant is a pizza marinara (that is, without cheese) for about €6. The price goes up from there depending on the toppings.
  • €20+- For a sit down lunch or dinner in a restaurant €20 is cheap and if you want you can go up to €200 a head.

Chinese restaurants are still quite cheap but other ethnic restaurants (Thai, Indian) are generally expensive (think €30 upwards per person). Sushi is very expensive (€40 minimum per person).

Waiters have been known to take advantage of patrons by bringing more expensive items than what was ordered or asking for a tip although it's not mandatory and should be included in the price by law.

€3.50- You buy the pizza and eat it walking around, since it's a bread shop with no sitting area. You can choose how much you want to eat, but you'll be spending about €2 per slice + about €1.50 for a can of soda or €1 for water.

€15-20- At lunchtime if you go to a restaurant you'll be spending between €15 for a set menu (not always good, try to go where you see Italian office people having their lunch as your best bet) and €20. For this you should get a pasta dish and a second course (meat) ending with coffee. Obviously if you have special wine the price will increase.

€20- At night you can spend about €20 at a pizza restaurant or if you have only one main course. Again, if you have special wine it will cost more. The cheapest food you can get at a decent restaurant is a pizza marinara (that is, without cheese) for about €6. The price goes up from there depending on the toppings.

€20+- For a sit down lunch or dinner in a restaurant €20 is cheap and if you want you can go up to €200 a head.

Starbucks has so far avoided Rome. And no wonder: Italian coffee is great so our friends from Seattle would face a lot of competition. Alattein Italian is just a glass of milk. If you're expecting coffee in that glass, you should ask for acaffe latte. Alatte macchiato(meaning "marked") is steamed milk stained with a smaller shot of espresso. "Espresso" or "normale" is just that, but more commonly just referred to ascaffe. Espresso doppiomeans a double shot of espresso, whileespresso macchiatois espresso 'marked' with a dab of steamed milk.Americano— the one to order if you like filter coffee — is espresso diluted with hot water and not drunk much by Italians.Cappuccinois well known outside of Italy, but be warned: it is considered very un-classy, and somewhat childish, to order one after 11AM (and certainly after a meal).Decaffeinatois self-explanatory, but often referred to by the common brand-nameCaffe Hag.

House winesare almost always drinkable and inexpensive (unlike, say, in the UK). You are better off ordering a bottle rather than house wine in most establishments in Rome due to some places watering down their wines. You may often find a bottle of wine on the table for you. Believe it or not: this bottle will be less expensive than a glass would be in the US or UK, possibly only €4 or €5. This does not always apply to those places that look really tourist-trap-like! Slightly better quality wines are usually sold at a relatively small mark-up on shop prices. Most Romans drink water with their meals. In restaurants it normally comes in 1 litre bottles and can be hadnormale(still water) orgassata(carbonated water).

Water is free at designatedwater fountains, called "nasone" (big nose). Some of these date back to ancient times, and the water is still very good. It's fresh spring water coming from the famous underground springs of Rome and is safe to drink. If you carry an empty bottle, fill it up for the rest of the day. Look for the drinking fountain with constant running water, plug the bottom hole, and cool water will shoot up from a smaller hole on top of the tap. Don't put your lips round the hole at the bottom, as stray dogs tend to like to get a drink.

Pre-dinner drinks (aperitivi) accompanied with small hors d'oeuvres (antipasti) are very popular with Romans: 1) chic yuppies in their 20s-30s crowd the area aroundPiazza delle Coppelle(behind the Parliament) andPiazza di Pietra(near the Chamber of Commerce); 2) younger generations sprawl around the square and streets ofCampo de' Fiori3) everyone sits to drink in the narrow streets behind the Pantheon (Piazza PasquinoandVia del Governo Vecchio).

Campo de' Fiori is a popular drinking spotGiven a heart for exploration,Testacciois the place to wander for after-dinner partying on the weekends. Head down there around 23:00 (take metro Line B and get off atPiramidestation) and listen for music. There are usually loads of people simply walking through the streets or looking for parking. Be brave, walk in, meet some wonderful Romans. This area is best in the winter. In the summer, the dancing moves to Ostia and Fregene, 45 minutes by car from Rome, at the seaside. Many clubs in Rome close in the summer months.

Many visitors like to go on Roman pub crawls. TheColosseum Pub Crawlfor example, has been throwing parties since 1999.

To the east ofTermini Station, and near the first University of Rome "La Sapienza", is theSan Lorenzodistrict, where you will find many pubs and clubs where university students and young Romans in their twenties spend their nights. On Saturday night the streets are crowded with people moving from one pub to another. On the city side of the railway, nearSanta Maria MaggioreCathedral, are some great Irish pubs, i.e. theFiddler's Elbow, the oldest in Rome, where many English-speaking residents and Italian customers like to sip their pints. It's a good place to meet Romans who speak English. Also nearby are theDruid's Den and the Druid's Rock .

OnVia Nazionalethere's a huge and beautiful pub called TheFlann o'Brien, one of the biggest in Rome. On the same street nearPiazza Veneziathere is another cluster of pubs includingTheNag's HeadScottish Pub. After 22.00 it's very expensive as it becomes more like a disco. Entrance with first drink costs €13 and drinks cost €8. Before midnight they sometimes host live music concerts. In the same area, at the beginning of ViaVittorio EmanueleII you can findThe Scholar's Lounge Irish pubwith nice music. This is definitely worth a look but there is no room to dance. During winter American colleges students residents in Rome end up their highly alcoholic nights here. Also nearby there's theTrinity CollegeIrish Pub. Drinks are quite expensive there.

Also on ViaVittorio Emanuele, nearPiazza Navona, there's theBulldog's Inn English pub. DJs play very good music there and there's room to dance, although few do. Nearby inCampo dei fiorithere are several crowded pubs. Beware, there have been huge and serious fights there. In the narrow streets behindPiazza Navonathere are also many places to go. TryJonathan's Angelsin Via del Fico. Also theAbbey Theatre Irish pubis a good place inVia del Governo Vecchio.

On the other side of the River Tiber (Tevere) isTrasteveredistrict where there are many places to eat and drink. This is also a good place where to enjoy a walk in crowded streets at night. In summer time onIsola Tiberina, the island in the Tiber, temporary bar are built and there are all sorts of things to do.

Far from the centrethere are some other good places. ThePalacavicchiin a small suburban town called Ciampino is a multi-dance room area where they play different kinds of music, mostly Latin American. You definitely need to get a cab to get there and it won't cost less than €20. South of Ciampino Airport there isThe Ice Clubfor ice skating, and theKirby'sand theGeronimopubs. All of them are nice places. At theGeronimopub before midnight there usually are live music concerts with many bands covering different genres. On Friday and Saturday nights after the concert they play disco music. Entrance is free and you may drink and eat as you feel. Very cool place and for every budget. Unfortunately you need a cab to get there.

Those Romans who speak fluent English usually have a great deal of confidence with tourists, so just offer them a beer and they will be glad to share with you their tip & tricks about night life in Rome.

Discos: There are many beautiful discos. Unfortunately the city is huge and it's not very easy to find them, unless you have a very good guide.

The best way to start is from the most established ones: Piper, Gilda, Alien, all of them run by theMidra Srl. Their website is nothing to write home about but can be used to discover telephone numbers and addresses.Gildais near theSpanish Steps, and the others not too far from Termini station. During summer they close to move to the seaside of Fregene (north of Fiumicino and Ostia) whereGilda on the Beachcan be found.

A pint of beer in pubs usually costs around €6, entrance in discos around €20 with first drink included. Drinks in discos cost around €10.

One of the places to be on Friday nights isGiardino delle Rosein via Casilina Vecchia 1 (rather central but reachable only by taxi): a luxurious garden with open-air bars and tables. Two large discos areMucca Assassinain via del Gazometro andClassicoin via Ostiense. During the week the main meeting place after dinner isComing Out(a bar right in front of the Colosseum) where crowds of gay Romans and tourists gather in and outside, all year round but overwhelmingly crowded during the summer or late-night clubs such asHangarin Via in Selci (Metro Line A, get off atManzonistation). The best sauna (open 24 hours during week ends) is Europa Multiclub in via Aureliana (behind Piazza Esedra, Metro Line ARepubblicastation). A meeting spot for gays day and (especially) night isMonte Caprino, the park on the Palatine hill behind the City Hall (Piazza Venezia) with spectacular views over the temples and ruins of ancient Rome.

- Via del Corso, Largo Goldoni, tel. : 68136061

- Castel Sant'Angelo, Piazza Pia, tel. : 68809707

- Fori Imperiali, Piazza Tempio della Pace, tel. : 69924307

- Piazza Navona, Piazza delle Cinque Lune, tel. : 68809240

- Via Nazionale, Piazza delle Esposizioni, tel. : 47824525

- Trastevere, Piazza San Sonnino, tel. : 58333457

- San Giovanniin Laterano, PiazzaSan Giovanni, tel. : 77203535

- Santa Maria Maggiore, Via dell_OLmata, tel. : 4740995

- Termini (arrivals), Piazza dei Cinquecenti, tel. : 47825194

- Termini, Galleria Gommata, Terminal 4, tel. : 48906300

- Fontana di Trevi, Via Marco Mingehtti, tel. : 3782988

Tourist information points (PIT), open daily 09:00-18:00

Romans regularly interact with foreigners and tourists; it shouldn't be hard to find friendly help provided you know some Italian. As for most every place in Italy, just be polite and you won't have much trouble.

If you hit someone with your luggage or shoulder while walking on a street, say "sorry" (Mi scusi): despite being very busy, Rome is not London or New York and going ahead is considered bad behaviour, while a little apology will be satisfactory.

In buses or trains, let older people have your seat if there's no space available. The gesture will be appreciated. Romans, and Italians as well, are very chaotic while in a queue, and often "clump" without any particular order: It's considered unpolite, but they do it anyway. Be careful while driving, as Romans often drive frantically and bend the rules to cope with the heavy traffic.

If you are a woman, you may get catcalled by men. It's safer to avoid interaction.

An Italian Carabiniere at guard duty in Monte GianicoloRome is generally a safe place, even for women traveling alone. However there have been rape cases around theRoma Terminitrain station, so be careful especially at night time. There is very little violent crime, but plenty of scams and pickpocketing that target tourists. As in any other big city, it is better if youdon't look like a tourist: don't exhibit your camera or camcorder to all and sundry, and keep your money in a safe place. Consciousness and vigilance are your best insurances for avoiding becoming a victim of a crime in Rome. Remember, if you are pickpocketed or victim of another scam, don't be afraid to shout, "Aiuto, al ladro!" (Help, Thief!) Romans will not be nice to the thief.

Members of the Italian public are likely to be sympathetic if you are a crime victim. Police are also generally friendly if not always helpful. Carabinieri (black uniform, red striped trousers) are military police, and Polizia (blue and grey uniform) are civilians, but they both do essentially the same thing and are equally good, or bad. If you are robbed, try to find a police station and report it. This is essential to establishing a secure insurance claim and to replace documents: the chances of it resulting in the return of your possessions are, however, fairly remote.

Rome is home to two rival Serie Asoccerclubs, A.S. Roma and S.S. Lazio, and there is a history of conflict, and even rioting, between the two. Never wear anything that shows that you support either of them, especially during the Rome Derby (when the two clubs play each other, known in Italian as theDerby della Capitale): avoid even wandering into groups of supporters of the other club, or you may be subject to heckling or even confrontation. Play it safe and refrain from openly supporting either club unless you are very familiar with the rivalry. If you are a fan of a foreign team that is playing in Rome,be very carefulas a number of supporters have been stabbed over the past few years.

Since Rome is incredibly popular as a tourist destination, a great deal of pickpocketing and bag or purse snatching takes place, especially in crowded locations, and pickpocketers in Rome can get pretty crafty. A 2010 study found that Rome was second only to Barcelona for pickpocketing of tourists. As a rule, you should pretty muchnever carry anything very valuable in any outside pocket, especially the front pocket of your pants is one of the easiest and most common targets. Keeping your wallet in your front pocket or in your bag is far from safe. You should consider using a money belt and carry only the cash for the day in your pocket. Pickpocketing on the Metro is rife in the form of gangs of young girls (8 to 12 years old) who jump on the trains just they are about to leave. They buffet you and have bags to hide where their hands are. You have been warned!

Also, beware of thieves—one popular technique that they use is to ride by you on a moped, slice the strap of a handbag with a knife, and ride off. They might also try to cut the bottom of your bag open and pick your wallet from the ground. Others will use the old trick of one person trying to distract you (asking for a cigarette or doing a strange dance) while another thief picks your pockets from behind. Bands of beggar kids will sometimes crowd you and reach for your pockets under the cover of newspapers or cardboard sheets. It is generally a good idea to be extremely wary of any strange person who gets too close to you, even in a crowd. If someone is in your personal space, shove the person away. As one frequent traveller put it, "Don't be afraid to be a dick in Rome." It is better to be rude than to be stolen from.

Termini (the main railway station), Esquilino, bus line 64 (Termini toSan Pietro), and the Trevi fountain are well known for pickpockets, so take extra care in these areas. On the Metro especially, pickpockets are extremely skilled. Remember that hotel rooms arenotsafe places for valuables; if your room has no safe, give your valuables to the hotel staff for safekeeping. Even if it does have a safe, hotels normally warn that they have no liability unless items are deposited in the main safe. Be wary while boarding or getting off the metro/train, especially if doors are about to close/closing. Thieves pretend to be helpful by pressing the 'door open' button for you, and while you gratefully squeeze into the train and catch your breath, they'll sidle up to you and pick your pocket or dip into your handbag or purse. Be aware of the danger and take the usual precautions and you should be all right.

Read up on the legends concerning touristscams. Most of them occur regularly in Rome and you will want to see them coming.

A particular scam is when some plainclothes police will approach you, asking to look for "drug money," or ask to see your passport. This is a scam to take your money. You can scare them by asking for their ID.Guardia di Finanza(the grey uniformed ones) do customs work.

Another scam involves men working near theSpanish Steps, aroundPiazza Navona, and outside of the Colosseum. They approach you, asking where you are from, and begin to tie bracelets around your wrists. When they are done they will try to charge you upwards of €20 for each bracelet. If anyone makes any attempt to reach for your hand, retract quickly. If you get trapped, you can refuse to pay, but this may not be wise if there are not many people around. Carry small bills or just change, in your wallet, so if you find yourself in cornered to pay for the bracelet, you can convince them that €1 or €2 is all you have.

When taking ataxi, be sure to remember license number written on the card door. In seconds, people have had a taxi bill risen by €10 or even more. When giving money to taxi driver, be careful.

Be careful ofcon-menwho may approach you at tourist sights such as the Colosseum orCircus Maximus. A car may pull up next to you, and the driver asks you for directions to the Vatican. He will strike up a conversation with you while he sits in his car and tell you he is a sales representative for a large French fashion house. He will then tell that you he likes you and he would like to give you a gift of a coat worth several thousand euros. As you reach inside his car to take the bag the coat is in, he will ask you for €200 for gas, as his car is nearly empty. Around tourist sites like theTrevi Fountain, Colosseum and theSpanish Stepsthere are groups mostly of men trying to sell cheap souvenirs. They may also carry roses and say they are giving you a gift because they like you, but the minute you take their 'gift' they demand money. They are often very insistent and often the only way to get rid of them is to be plain rude. Do the best you can to not take their "gifts" as they will follow you around asking for money. Simply saying "no" or "go away" will get them off your back until the next vendor comes up to you.

Be wary of places to change currency. Read ALL signs before changing money. Oftentimes places set up just for currency exchange will add as much as a 20% service fee on all money being traded. The shops near the Vatican have especially high service fees, whereas places near theTrevi Fountainwill be more reasonable. The best bet is to change enough money before you leave your home country. There are few places around the city that are under the table and are just interested in American money. These places charge no service fee.

The best advice to avoid scams is to get away from anyone that you have never seen before they start talking to you.

In an emergency, call 112 (Carabinieri), 113 (Police), 118 (medical first aid) or 115 (firemen). Carry the address of your embassy or consulate.

On anything else you may need for your Rome holiday, you can contact the official help line of the Minister of Tourism 039.039.039. From Monday to Sunday, from 9.00 to 22.00, in seven languages seven days a week.

  • Police. To report theft you should generally go to the Carabinieri station nearest where the theft occurred. Ask people at the scene of the crime where to go.
  • Left Luggage Termini. You can leave luggage at Termini but they have a lot of security and only one X-ray machine so there can be a +100 people queue. It costs about €4 per bag (of any size) for the first 5 hours, €0.80 per bag for each hour thereafter. There's a sign limiting bags to 20 kg each, but no facility for weighing them (that I saw) so it's probably not enforced.
  • Splashnet laundry, internet, left luggage, Via Varesi 33, 100 m west of Termini. €2 per luggage left (and 15 min of internet included).

  • AfghanistanAfghanistan, Via Nomentana120 phone=.
  • AustraliaAustralia, Via Antonio Bosio 5, +39 06 85 2721. M-F 08:30-16:00.
  • AustriaAustria, Via Pergolesi 3, +39 068440141. M-F 09:00-12:00.
  • AzerbaijanAzerbaijan, VialeRegina Margherita1, 2 piano, 00198, +39 06 85 30 55 57.
  • BrazilBrazil, Piazza Navona, 14, +39 06 683-981. M-F 09:00-17:00.
  • BulgariaBulgaria, Via Pietro Polo Rubens 21, +39 06 322 46 40, +39 06 322 46 43. M-F 09:00-17:00.
  • CanadaCanada, Via Zara 30, +39 06 44598 1.
  • ChinaChina, Via Bruxelles 56, +39 06 8413458.
  • CroatiaCroatia, Via Luigi Bodio 74/76, +39 06 363 07650. M-F 09:30-12:30.
  • DenmarkDenmark, Via deiMonti Parioli50, +39 06 9774 831. M-F 08:00-17:30.
  • EgyptEgypt, Via Salaria267, +39 06 8440-1976. M-F 09:00-17:00.
  • EstoniaEstonia, Ambasciata di Estonia, Viale Liegi 28 int. 5, +39 06 844 075 10. M-F 09:00-12:00.
  • FinlandFinland, Ambasciata di Finlandia, Via Lisbona 3, +39 06 852 231. M-F 08:00-17:30.
  • FranceFrance, Piazza Farnese67, +39 066 86011.
  • GermanyGermany, Ambasciata di Germania, Via San Martino della Battaglia 4, +39 06 49 213-1.
  • GreeceGreece, Ambasciata di Grecia, Via S. Mercadante 36, +39 06 853 7551.
  • HungaryHungary, Via Messina, 15 00198 Roma, +39 06 442 49938, +39 06 442 49939.
  • IndiaIndia, Via XX Settembre, 5, 00187 Rome (Italy), +39 06 4884642 (/3/4/5).
  • IndonesiaIndonesia, Via Campania 55, 00187, +39 06 4200911.
  • IrelandIreland, Piazza di Campitelli 3, +39 06 6979 121. M-F 10:00-12:30, 15:00-16:30.
  • LithuaniaLithuania, Viale di Villa Grazioli 9, +39 06 855 90 52, +39 06 854 04 82. M-F 07:00-17:00.
  • MacedoniaMacedonia, Via Bruxelles 73/75, +39 06 8419868, +39 06 84241109. M-F 09:00-17:00.
  • MalaysiaMalaysia, Via Nomentana, 297, +39 06 8415764. 09:00-16:00 (no lunch break).
  • MaltaMalta, Lungotevere Marzio 12, +39 06 6879990.
  • the NetherlandsNetherlands, Via Michele Mercati 8, +39 06 3228 6001. M-F 08:00-17:30.
  • New ZealandNew Zealand, Via Zara 28, +39 06 441 7171.
  • NorwayNorway, Via delle Terme Deciane 7, +39 06 571 7031.
  • PakistanPakistan, Via Della Camilluccia 682, 00135, +39 06 36 1775. M-F 09:30-16:20.
  • PolandPoland, Via P.P.Rubens, 20, +39 06 36 20 42 00, +39 06 36 20 42 04, +39 06 36 20 42 17.
  • RomaniaRomania, Via Nicolo Tartaglia, 36, +39 06 808 45 29, +39 06 807 88 07, +39 06 808 35 37. M-F 08:30-13:00; 14:00-17.:30.
  • RussiaRussia, +39 06 4941680, +39 06 4941681.
  • SerbiaSerbia, Via deiMonti Parioli20, +39 06 320 07 96, +39 06 320 08 90, +39 06 320 09 59, +39 06 320 08 05 (all night). telex 616-303
  • SloveniaSlovenia, Via Leonardo Pisano 10, +39 06 80 914 310, +39 335 80 64 552 (all night).
  • South AfricaSouth Africa, Via Tanaro 14, +39 06 85 25 41. M-F 08:00-16:30.
  • SpainSpain, Palazzo Borghese, Largo Fontanella di Borghese 19, +39 06 684 04 011.
  • TurkeyTurkey, 28, Via Palestro 00185, +39 06 445 941.
  • UkraineUkraine, ViaGuido d'Arezzo, 9, +39 06 841 26 30.
  • the United KingdomUnited Kingdom, Via XX Settembre 80/a, +39 06 4220 0001, +39 06 4220 0001 (emergency consular help). Appointments only.
  • the United StatesUnited States of America, ViaVittorio Veneto119/A, +39 06 4674 1. M-F 08:30AM-17:30.
  • VenezuelaVenezuela, Via Nicolò Tartaglia, 11, +39 06 807 97 97. M-F 09:30AM-13:00, 14:00-17:00.

AfghanistanAfghanistan, Via Nomentana 120 phone=.

AustraliaAustralia, Via Antonio Bosio 5, +39 06 85 2721. M-F 08:30-16:00.

AustriaAustria, Via Pergolesi 3, +39 068440141. M-F 09:00-12:00.

AzerbaijanAzerbaijan, Viale Regina Margherita 1, 2 piano, 00198, +39 06 85 30 55 57.

BrazilBrazil, Piazza Navona, 14, +39 06 683-981. M-F 09:00-17:00.

BulgariaBulgaria, Via Pietro Polo Rubens 21, +39 06 322 46 40, +39 06 322 46 43. M-F 09:00-17:00.

CanadaCanada, Via Zara 30, +39 06 44598 1.

ChinaChina, Via Bruxelles 56, +39 06 8413458.

CroatiaCroatia, Via Luigi Bodio 74/76, +39 06 363 07650. M-F 09:30-12:30.

DenmarkDenmark, Via dei Monti Parioli 50, +39 06 9774 831. M-F 08:00-17:30.

EgyptEgypt, Via Salaria 267, +39 06 8440-1976. M-F 09:00-17:00.

EstoniaEstonia, Ambasciata di Estonia, Viale Liegi 28 int. 5, +39 06 844 075 10. M-F 09:00-12:00.

FinlandFinland, Ambasciata di Finlandia, Via Lisbona 3, +39 06 852 231. M-F 08:00-17:30.

FranceFrance, Piazza Farnese 67, +39 066 86011.

GermanyGermany, Ambasciata di Germania, Via San Martino della Battaglia 4, +39 06 49 213-1.

GreeceGreece, Ambasciata di Grecia, Via S. Mercadante 36, +39 06 853 7551.

HungaryHungary, Via Messina, 15 00198 Roma, +39 06 442 49938, +39 06 442 49939.

IndiaIndia, Via XX Settembre, 5, 00187 Rome (Italy), +39 06 4884642 (/3/4/5).

IndonesiaIndonesia, Via Campania 55, 00187, +39 06 4200911.

IrelandIreland, Piazza di Campitelli 3, +39 06 6979 121. M-F 10:00-12:30, 15:00-16:30.

LithuaniaLithuania, Viale di Villa Grazioli 9, +39 06 855 90 52, +39 06 854 04 82. M-F 07:00-17:00.

MacedoniaMacedonia, Via Bruxelles 73/75, +39 06 8419868, +39 06 84241109. M-F 09:00-17:00.

MalaysiaMalaysia, Via Nomentana, 297, +39 06 8415764. 09:00-16:00 (no lunch break).

MaltaMalta, Lungotevere Marzio 12, +39 06 6879990.

the NetherlandsNetherlands, Via Michele Mercati 8, +39 06 3228 6001. M-F 08:00-17:30.

New ZealandNew Zealand, Via Zara 28, +39 06 441 7171.

NorwayNorway, Via delle Terme Deciane 7, +39 06 571 7031.

PakistanPakistan, Via Della Camilluccia 682, 00135, +39 06 36 1775. M-F 09:30-16:20.

PolandPoland, Via P.P.Rubens, 20, +39 06 36 20 42 00, +39 06 36 20 42 04, +39 06 36 20 42 17.

RomaniaRomania, Via Nicolo Tartaglia, 36, +39 06 808 45 29, +39 06 807 88 07, +39 06 808 35 37. M-F 08:30-13:00; 14:00-17.:30.

RussiaRussia, +39 06 4941680, +39 06 4941681.

SerbiaSerbia, Via dei Monti Parioli 20, +39 06 320 07 96, +39 06 320 08 90, +39 06 320 09 59, +39 06 320 08 05 (all night). telex 616-303

SloveniaSlovenia, Via Leonardo Pisano 10, +39 06 80 914 310, +39 335 80 64 552 (all night).

South AfricaSouth Africa, Via Tanaro 14, +39 06 85 25 41. M-F 08:00-16:30.

SpainSpain, Palazzo Borghese, Largo Fontanella di Borghese 19, +39 06 684 04 011.

TurkeyTurkey, 28, Via Palestro 00185, +39 06 445 941.

UkraineUkraine, Via Guido d'Arezzo, 9, +39 06 841 26 30.

the United KingdomUnited Kingdom, Via XX Settembre 80/a, +39 06 4220 0001, +39 06 4220 0001 (emergency consular help). Appointments only.

the United StatesUnited States of America, Via Vittorio Veneto 119/A, +39 06 4674 1. M-F 08:30AM-17:30.

VenezuelaVenezuela, Via Nicolò Tartaglia, 11, +39 06 807 97 97. M-F 09:30AM-13:00, 14:00-17:00.

  • SingaporeSingapore, Via Frattina, 89, +39-06 69940398. M-F 09:30-13:00.

SingaporeSingapore, Via Frattina, 89, +39-06 69940398. M-F 09:30-13:00.

Police. To report [[theft]] you should generally go to the Carabinieri station nearest where the theft occurred. Ask people at the scene of the crime where to go.

Left Luggage Termini. You can leave luggage at Termini but they have a lot of security and only one X-ray machine so there can be a +100 people queue. It costs about €4 per bag (of any size) for the first 5 hours, €0.80 per bag for each hour thereafter. There's a sign limiting bags to 20 kg each, but no facility for weighing them (that I saw) so it's probably not enforced.

Splashnet laundry, internet, left luggage, Via Varesi 33, 100 m west of Termini. €2 per luggage left (and 15 min of internet included).

  • Metropolitan Rome:
    • The Etruscan site ofCerveteri
    • Head toFrascati, one of the historic hill towns to the South East of Rome known as theCastelli Romani. This town has been a popular destination for centuries away from the hustle and bustle of the capital, and this is still true today. Famous worldwide for its white wine, Frascati is a relaxed hill town with a slower pace of life. Just 21 km from Rome, Frascati is accessible by bus or train. Trains run fromRoma Terminiapproximately every hour, take about 30 minutes, and cost around €2. Also in the Castelli isCastel Gandolfo, the summer residence of the Pope. The town overlooks Lake Albano, a popular weekend trip for Romans in the summer. Also accessible by bus and train but there are several interesting towns and villages in the Castelli so hiring a car for the day would be well-rewarded.
    • Head to Ostia Antica, the ancient harbor and military colony of Rome. It is accessible by Metro every 30 minutes from Stazione Piramide (near the Pyramid). It is a monumental area a bit like the Colosseum district, but in Ostia Antica you can get an impression how a Roman city really looked.
    • Consider a day trip to Tivoli to see the Villa d'Este with its famous and glorious fountains. Check out the Emperor Hadrian's Villa while you are out there. Hourly trains from Tiburtina; fewer on Sundays.
    • Understand the Second World War in Italy by visiting theAnziobeachhead area, the landing museum at Anzio and Monte Cassino.
    • Canterano, a picturesque village with strange legends just a few km away.
    • Civitavecchia, the port of Rome, is the point of arrival and departure of hundreds of ships, cruises, and ferries travelling all around the Mediterranean. From here it is possible to reach Sardinia, Corsica, Sicily, Spain, France, some other small islands, and even north Africa. A good transportation system links the port to the Eternal City, e.g., see "Get in" "By train" above.
  • Viterbo (province) is the northern part of Lazio.
    • Explore the Etruscan sites ofTarquiniaandVulci.
    • Discover the papal city ofViterbo, well-known medieval and thermal destination (about 1 and half hours from Rome)
  • Palestrinais a centre 40 km from Rome, rich in archaeological remains from the Roman time. Among the things to see: thePagan Temple of the Goddess " Fortuna ", theNationalArchaeological Museum( housed in the RenaissancePalazzo Barberini), theRoman Forumand theNilotic Mosaic.
  • Campania is the coastal region south of Lazio.
    • VisitNaplesand the famed islands in its gulf,Capri, IschiaandProcida. Naples is 1 hour away by high speed train.
    • Especially if you have a rail pass, makingPompeiia day trip, while it is a very full day, is very doable. To reach Pompeii from Rome will take about 3 hours.

[[Metropolitan Rome]]:

  • The Etruscan site of [[Cerveteri]]
  • Head to [[Frascati]], one of the historic hill towns to the South East of Rome known as the[[Castelli Romani]]. This town has been a popular destination for centuries away from the hustle and bustle of the capital, and this is still true today. Famous worldwide for its white wine, Frascati is a relaxed hill town with a slower pace of life. Just 21 km from Rome, Frascati is accessible by bus or train. Trains run from Roma Termini approximately every hour, take about 30 minutes, and cost around €2. Also in the Castelli is [[Castel Gandolfo]], the summer residence of the Pope. The town overlooks Lake Albano, a popular weekend trip for Romans in the summer. Also accessible by bus and train but there are several interesting towns and villages in the Castelli so hiring a car for the day would be well-rewarded.
  • Head to [[Ostia|Ostia Antica]], the ancient harbor and military colony of Rome. It is accessible by Metro every 30 minutes from Stazione Piramide (near the Pyramid). It is a monumental area a bit like the Colosseum district, but in Ostia Antica you can get an impression how a Roman city really looked.
  • Consider a day trip to [[Tivoli]] to see the Villa d'Este with its famous and glorious fountains. Check out the Emperor Hadrian's Villa while you are out there. Hourly trains from Tiburtina; fewer on Sundays.
  • Understand the Second World War in Italy by visiting the [[Anzio]] beachhead area, the landing museum at Anzio and [[Monte Cassino]].
  • [[Canterano]], a picturesque village with strange legends just a few km away.
  • [[Civitavecchia]], the port of Rome, is the point of arrival and departure of hundreds of ships, cruises, and ferries travelling all around the Mediterranean. From here it is possible to reach [[Sardinia]], [[Corsica]], [[Sicily]], [[Spain]], [[France]], some other small islands, and even north [[Africa]]. A good transportation system links the port to the Eternal City, e.g., see "Get in" "By train" above.

Palestrinais a centre 40 km from Rome, rich in archaeological remains from the Roman time. Among the things to see: thePagan Temple of the Goddess " Fortuna ", theNational Archaeological Museum( housed in the Renaissance Palazzo Barberini ), theRoman Forumand theNilotic Mosaic.


Popular train routes departing from Rome Termini Central(Roma Termini)

Florence | CATANIA | Geneva | ORTE | Fiorentina di Piombino | UDINE | Vienna | ASSISI | AGRIGENTO | Florence | Zurich | Milan | Florence | Albacina | Milan | Pietrasanta | Settimo Vittone | Munich | MONTREUX | Florence | CIVITAVECCHIA | Munich | INNSBRUCK | Bracciano |


Popular train routes arriving in Rome Termini Central(Roma Termini)

Florence | Pompei | UDINE | Naples | MODENA | Tivoli | ASSISI | INNSBRUCK | Monterosso | Milan | PISA | Turin | PARIS | Milan | Munich | LAUSANNE | Venice | BENEVENTO | BARI | Spiez | LJUBLJANA | Vienna | Munich | Munich |