TOKYO(東京)

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TOKYO(東京)

The world's largest city brings a huge, wealthy and fascinating metropolis with high-tech visions of the future side by side with glimpses of old Japan.

Hot Places to Visit

Ariake Coliseum

Ariake Coliseum is an indoor sporting arena in Ariake Tennis Forest Park located in Ariake, Koto, Tokyo, Japan. It has a capacity of 10,000. The arena is used as the center court for the Japan Open Tennis Championships and the Toray Pan Pacific Open held in Ariake Tennis Forest Park. It is one of the few professional tennis venues which has a retractable roof. This venue will also host Road FC 24, instead of Ryogoku Kokugikan. The venue will host tennis events at the 2020 Summer Olympics.

The National Art Center

The National Art Center, Tokyo is a museum in Roppongi, Minato, Tokyo, Japan. A joint project of the Agency for Cultural Affairs and the National Museums Independent Administrative Institution, it stands on a site formerly occupied by a research facility of the University of Tokyo. The building has been designed by Kisho Kurokawa. It is one of the largest exhibition spaces in the country. Access is from Nogizaka Station on the Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line. Unlike Japan's other national art museums, NACT is an 'empty museum', without a collection, permanent display, and curators. Like Kunsthalle in German-speaking regions, it accommodates temporary exhibitions sponsored and curated by other organizations. The policy has been successful. In its first fiscal year in 2007, it had 69 exhibitions organized by arts groups and 10 organized by NACT. Its Monet exhibition, held between 7 April and 2 July 2007, was the second most visited exhibition of the year, not only in Japan but in the world.

Yomiuri Land

Yomiuriland is one of the larger and well known Japanese amusement parks near Tokyo, first opened in 1964. It is situated on hillsides, and features modern thrill rides such as roller coasters and water flumes. It is home to Yomiuri Giants Stadium, one of the training fields for the Yomiuri Giants baseball team, and was the primary training ground before Tokyo Dome was completed. It is operated and run by the Yomiuri Group, the parent of media conglomerate Yomiuri Shimbun. Recently a bathhouse was constructed to attract more senior citizens. Entrance fees are 1600 yen for adults, 800 yen for children and seniors (aged 60 over).

Tokyo Skytree

Tokyo Skytree is a broadcasting, restaurant, and observation tower in Sumida, Tokyo, Japan. It became the tallest structure in Japan in 2010 and reached its full height of 634.0m in March 2011, making it the tallest tower in the world, displacing the Canton Tower, and the second tallest structure in the world after the Burj Khalifa . The tower is the primary television and radio broadcast site for the Kantō region; the older Tokyo Tower no longer gives complete digital terrestrial television broadcasting coverage because it is surrounded by high-rise buildings. Skytree was completed on 29 February 2012, with the tower opening to the public on 22 May 2012. The tower is the centrepiece of a large commercial development funded by Tobu Railway and a group of six terrestrial broadcasters headed by NHK. Trains stop at the adjacent Tokyo Skytree Station and nearby Oshiage Station. The complex is 7km north-east of Tokyo Station.

Tsukiji Fish Market

More properly the Tokyo Metropolitan Central Wholesale Market, the famous market is worth a visit for 1600 stalls of bizarre sea creatures, including large blue fin tuna, live shell fish, deep sea crabs, eels and salmon. As you might expect everything is covered in slippery sea water, so choose footwear accordingly. To avoid obstructing traffic, you should not bring large bags or suitcases. Also, watch out for water (often with blood) splashing from containers being moved. It is very busy but the locals don't mind visitors and photographs (no flash), as long as you stay out of the way and don't get in the way of business. Get here as early as possible, which means a taxi if you want to see the auctions, but much cheaper and quite acceptable alternative is to take the first subway in the morning around 6. Hibiya line Tsukiji station is a short walk away, while O-Edo line Tsukiji-shijo drops you right next to the action. While the market stays open until 1PM, the action drops off after 8AM and many shops close after 10AM or so. Note that the wholesale market inside Tsukiji is off-limits to visitors until after 9 AM, although visitors are welcome to visit the outside market when it opens from 5 AM. To visit the morning tuna auctions, it is important to get to Tsukiji as early as possible, as there is a daily maximum of 120 visitors allowed into the tuna auction whenever it is held. Viewing tickets are issued on a first come, first serve basis beginning at 4:30 AM at the market's Fish Information Center, located next to the Kachidoki entrance. The first 60 ticket holders are able to view the auction from 5:25 AM until 5:50 AM, while the other 60 ticket holders can view the remainder of the auction from 5:50 AM until 6:15 AM. Visitors must adhere to strict rules when viewing the auction, including no flash photography, no touching the fish, and no actions that would otherwise interfere with any auction-related activities. Note that the tuna auction may still be off-limits during busy times of the year. A few tour companies do advertise tours that include visits to the tuna auction, but with the disclaimer that it may not be possible to see it if it gets too crowded. The Tsukiji fish market was supposed to move to a new market in Toyosu in November 2016, but the move was delayed, and it might not happen at all, due to safety and finance concerns about the proposed new location.

Tokyo Disneyland

Tokyo Disneyland is a 115acre theme park at the Tokyo Disney Resort in Urayasu, Chiba, Japan, near Tokyo. Its main gate is directly adjacent to both Maihama Station and Tokyo Disneyland Station. It was the first Disney park to be built outside the United States, and it opened on 15 April 1983. The park was constructed by Walt Disney Imagineering in the same style as Disneyland in California and Magic Kingdom in Florida. It is owned by The Oriental Land Company, which licenses the theme from The Walt Disney Company. Tokyo Disneyland and its companion park, Tokyo DisneySea, are the only Disney parks not wholly or partly owned by the Walt Disney Company . The park has seven themed areas: the World Bazaar; the four classic Disney lands: Adventureland, Westernland, Fantasyland and Tomorrowland; and two mini-lands: Critter Country and Mickey's Toontown. Many of these areas mirror those in the original Disneyland as they are based on American Disney films and fantasies. Fantasyland includes Peter Pan's Flight, Snow White's Scary Adventures, Dumbo the Flying Elephant, based on classic Disney films and characters. The park is noted for its extensive open spaces, to accommodate the large crowds that visit the park. In 2013, Tokyo Disneyland hosted 17.2 million visitors, making it the world's second-most visited theme park behind the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World Resort.

Omotesandō

Omotesandō is a zelkova tree-lined avenue located in Shibuya and Minato, Tokyo, stretching from the entrance to the Meiji Shrine, to Aoyama-dori where Omotesando Station can be found.

Imperial Palace

The Tokyo Imperial Palace is the primary residence of the Emperor of Japan. It is a large park-like area located in the Chiyoda ward of Tokyo and contains buildings including the main palace, the private residences of the Imperial Family, an archive, museums and administrative offices. It is built on the site of the old Edo Castle. The total area including the gardens is 3.41sqkm. During the height of the 1980s Japanese property bubble, the palace grounds were valued by some to be more than the value of all of the real estate in the state of California.

Hot Activities

Shibuya

Most of the action in Shibuya is in the hectic blocks to the northwest of the JR station.

Odaiba

Odaiba was originally constructed in 1853 by the Tokugawa shogunate as a series of 6 fortresses in order to protect Tokyo from attack by sea, the primary threat being Commodore Matthew Perry's Blac...

Asakusa

Asakusa (浅草) is a part of Tokyo's downtown Taito district best known for its many temples, particularly Sensōji .

Tokyo/Chuo

Chūō is a special ward that forms part of the heart of Tokyo, Japan. The ward refers to itself in English as Chūō City.

Buddhist

Buddhist religious architecture developed in the Indian Subcontinent in the 3rd century BCE.

Ueno

If you want to get a feel for old Tokyo, Ueno (上野) in the Taito district is a good place to start.

Tours

Tokyo Day Tour: Meiji Shrine, Asakusa Temple and Tokyo Bay Cruise

Discover the highlights of Tokyo on a full-day guided tour, the perfect introduction to the city. Visit Meiji Shrine, Japan's most famous Shinto shrine, stroll the gardens of the Imperial Palace, and spend time at Asakusa Kannon Temple (Senso-ji), Tokyo’s oldest Buddhist temple. See shopping areas like Nakamise Shopping Street and the Ginza district, then enjoy a boat cruise on Tokyo Bay. Your experienced guide shares the history and culture of Tokyo as you explore the ancient and modern aspects of this bustling city.

Go-Kart Rental and Akihabara Street Race

Discover Tokyo from a different perspective with a go-kart rental in the Akihabara neighborhood. Ride your fun vehicle through the public streets after a briefing on how to drive the go-karts before you set off. Explore at your own pace.

Japanese Calligraphy Experience with a Professional Shodo Master in Tokyo

Get an introduction to the fine art of Shodo , Japanese calligraphy with a a renowned designer and professional calligraphy master in this 1.5-hour lesson. Learn how to write basics, including your name and simple kanji (Japanese characters) with a brush.  By the end of the class you will have a piece of art to bring back home.

Tokyo Private Custom Full-Day Walking Tour

With this private tour, you can see Tokyo efficiently and have a deeper understanding in one day. Meet at your hotel, then move to Tsukiji market and feel the atmosphere of the world’s biggest fish market. After that, go to Asakusa and visit one of the most famous temples in Tokyo, Sensoji Temple, and walk around traditional town. After lunch in Asakusa, move to Harajuku area and you will combine the old and the new. See the Meiji shrine and calm shrine, and Takeshita street, with its young pop culture. At last, move to Shibuya and experience the famous scramble crossing.

Japan’s Cultural Curiosities Walking Tour

Explore hidden shops that sell traditional items not commonly found in modern-day Japan. Sample old-world sweet and savory snacks, learn about the art of making incense, visit a seaweed seller, and see a side of the city frozen in time.

From Tokyo: Mt. Fuji and Hakone Tour with Bullet Train

Get spectacular views of Mt. Fuji and its surrounding mountains on a day trip from Tokyo. Cruise across Lake Ashi by boat and take the ropeway up Mt. Komagatake. Relax in the hot springs resort of Hakone, and then catch the bullet train back to Tokyo.

TOKYO(東京) Guide

The bulk of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, Shinjuku

This article is about the 23 special wards of Tokyo, which corresponds to what foreigners (and many Japanese) think of as the "city of Tokyo". For the prefecture of Japan, see Tokyo Metropolis.

Tokyo(東京Tōkyō) is the enormous and wealthy capital of Japan, and also its main city, overflowing with culture, commerce, and most of all, people. As the most densely populated urban area in the world, Tokyo is a fascinating and dynamic metropolis that mixes foreign influences, consumer culture and global business along with remnants of the capital of old Japan. From modern electronics and gleaming skyscrapers to cherry blossoms and the Imperial Palace, this city represents the entire sweep of Japanese history and culture. Tokyo truly has something for every traveller.

Huge and varied in its geography, with over 2,000 km² to explore,Tokyo Metropolis(東京都Tōkyō-to) spans not just the city, but rugged mountains to the west and subtropical islands to the south. Tokyo Metropolis legally contains 23 regions (区 ku), which refer to themselves as "cities"; to avoid confusion, Wikivoyage refers to them as "wards" of Tokyo, which is much more common in English.This article concentrates on the 23 central wards near the bay, while the western cities and the islands are covered in a separate article.

The geography of central Tokyo is defined by the JRYamanote Line(see Get around). The center of Tokyo — the former area reserved for the Shogun and his samurai — lies within the loop, while the Edo-era downtown (下町shitamachi) is to the north and east. Sprawling around in all directions and blending in seamlessly areYokohama, Kawasaki and Chiba, Tokyo's suburbs.

Over 500 years old, the city of Tokyo was once the modest fishing village ofEdo(江戸 - literallyGate of the River) due to its location at the mouth of Sumida-gawa. The city only truly began to grow when it became the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1603, who decided to set up a new seat of power far away from the intrigues of the imperial court inKyoto. After the Meiji restoration in 1868, during which the Tokugawa family lost its influence, the emperor and the imperial family moved here from Kyoto, and the city was renamed to its current name, Tokyo, literally the "Eastern Capital". The metropolitan center of the country, Tokyo is the destination for business, education, modern culture, and government. (That's not to say that rivals such asOsakawon't dispute those claims.

Shinjuku at night

Tokyo isvast: it's best thought of not as a single city, but a constellation of cities that have grown together. Tokyo's districts vary wildly by character, from the electronic blare of Akihabara to the Imperial gardens and shrines of Chiyoda, from the hyperactive youth culture mecca of Shibuya to the pottery shops and temple markets of Asakusa. If you don't like what you see, hop on the train and head to the next station, and you will find something entirely different.

The sheer size and frenetic pace of Tokyo can intimidate the first-time visitor. Much of the city is a jungle of concrete and wires, with a mass of neon and blaring loudspeakers. At rush hour, crowds jostle in packed trains and masses of humanity sweep through enormous and bewilderingly complex stations. Don't get too hung up on ticking tourist sights off your list: for most visitors, the biggest part of the Tokyo experience is just wandering around at random and absorbing the vibe, poking your head into shops selling weird and wonderful things, sampling restaurants where you can't recognize a single thing on the menu (or on your plate), and finding unexpected oases of calm in the tranquil grounds of a neighbourhood Shinto shrine. It's all perfectly safe, and the locals will go to sometimes extraordinary lengths to help you if you just ask.

The cost of living in Tokyo is not as astronomical as it once was. Deflation and market pressures have helped to make costs in Tokyo comparable to most other large cities in the developed world. Visitors from San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, London, Paris, Sydney, Toronto and Dublin will not find it any more expensive than back home. Travellers should budget a similar amount of money for their stay in Tokyo as they would for any other great city in Europe, North America or Australia. Locals will know the bargains, but experienced cheapskates from anywhere in the world can get by with a little ingenuity. Tokyo is one of the most popular places to live in Japan. Rent for a single's apartment could range from USD500 to USD1,000 a month. Tokyo is so overwhelmingly crowded that many people live in apartments no bigger than 16 square meters (175 square feet).

Cherry blossom picnic at Tamagawadai Park in Tokyo's Ota ward

Tokyo is classified as lying in the humid subtropical climate zone and has five distinct seasons.

  • Springkicks off with plum blossoms in late February, followed by the famous cherry blossoms (sakura) in March–April. Parks, most famously Ueno, fill up with blue tarps and sozzled salarymen.
  • Rainy season (baiuortsuyu) in late May to June means a month of overcast skies and drizzle punctuated with downpours, with temperatures in the twenties.
  • Summerreally kicks off in July, with clear skies but temperatures peaking into the high thirties and brutal steam bath humidity. Even a short walk outside will leave you drenched in sweat, so this is probably the worst time of year to visit, and is best avoided if you have a choice. The one bright spot is the plethora offireworks, most notably the epic pyrotechnic extravaganza of the Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival on the fourth Saturday in July.
  • Fallfrom September onwards means cooler temperatures and fall colors. While southern Japan is regularly battered by typhoons this time of year, they mostly (but not always) veer clear of Tokyo.
  • Winteris usually mild, with temperatures generally ranging from 0-10 °C, though occasional cold spells can send temperatures plummeting below zero at night, and indoor heating can leave much to be desired. Snow is rare, but on those rare occasions once every few years when Tokyo is hit by a snowstorm, much of the train network grinds to a halt.

Springkicks off with plum blossoms in late February, followed by the famous cherry blossoms (sakura) in March–April. Parks, most famously [[Tokyo/Ueno|Ueno]], fill up with blue tarps and sozzled salarymen.

Rainy season (baiuortsuyu) in late May to June means a month of overcast skies and drizzle punctuated with downpours, with temperatures in the twenties.

Summerreally kicks off in July, with clear skies but temperatures peaking into the high thirties and brutal steam bath humidity. Even a short walk outside will leave you drenched in sweat, so this is probably the worst time of year to visit, and is best avoided if you have a choice. The one bright spot is the plethora offireworks, most notably the epic pyrotechnic extravaganza of the Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival on the fourth Saturday in July.

Fallfrom September onwards means cooler temperatures and fall colors. While southern Japan is regularly battered by typhoons this time of year, they mostly (but not always) veer clear of Tokyo.

Winteris usually mild, with temperatures generally ranging from 0-10 °C, though occasional cold spells can send temperatures plummeting below zero at night, and indoor heating can leave much to be desired. Snow is rare, but on those rare occasions once every few years when Tokyo is hit by a snowstorm, much of the train network grinds to a halt.

It's possible for English speakers to navigate their way around Tokyo without speaking any Japanese. Signs at subway and train stations include the station names inromaji(Romanized characters), and larger stations often have signs in Chinese and Korean as well. Though most people under the age of 40 have learned English in school, proficiency is generally poor, and most locals would not know more than a few basic words and phrases. Some restaurants may have English menus, but it does not necessarily mean that the staff will speak much English. Reading and writing comes much better though, and many people can understand a great deal of written English without actually knowing how to speak it. That being said, staff at the main hotels and tourist attractions generally speak an acceptable level of English. While it is possible to get by with only English, it will nevertheless make your trip much smoother if you can learn some basic Japanese.

Sensoji Temple, Asakusa Koishikawa Korakuen Park, Bunkyo The Tokyo Skytree, the second tallest structure in the worldTokyo has a vast array of sights, but the first items on the agenda of most visitors are the temples of Asakusa, the gardens of theImperial Palace(in Chiyoda) and theMeiji Shrine(明治神宮Meiji-jingū, in Harajuku).

Tokyo has many commercial centres for shopping, eating and simply wandering around for experiencing the modern Japanese urban phenomenon. Each of these areas have unique characteristics, such as dazzling Shinjuku, youthful Shibuya and upmarketGinza. These areas are bustling throughout the day, but they really come into life in the evenings.

If you're looking for a viewing platform, Tokyo has plenty of options:

  • TheTokyo SkyTree(¥2,060-3,090) is Tokyo's latest attraction, not to mention it's also the second-tallest structure in the world, soaring to more than 2000 feet above the ground. However, its location away from downtown means the view is a distant jumble of buildings.
  • The more familiarTokyo Toweris still around. At ¥820-1,420, it's not as expensive as its newest rival, but neither is the view as good as some alternatives.
  • For a view that's light on your wallet, head to theTokyo Metropolitan Governmentbuildings (in effect, Tokyo's City Hall) in Shinjuku. Its twin towers have viewing platforms that are absolutely free, and offer a great view over Tokyo and beyond.
  • TheWorld Trade Center Building(10:00-20:00, or 21:00 in July and August, ¥620) at JR Hamamatsucho station offers stunning views of Tokyo Tower and the waterfront due to its excellent location, especially at dusk.
  • Tokyo City Viewhas an observation deck with great views of Tokyo Bay and downtown Tokyo including the nearby Tokyo Tower – admission is a steep ¥1,800-2,300, but includes admission to theMori Art Museum.
  • TheRainbow Bridgelinking Tokyo to Odaiba is another good option, if you don't mind traffic noise and smell. The bridge's pedestrian walkways (open until 20:00 at night) are free, and the night-time view across Tokyo Bay is impressive.
  • TheBunkyo Civic Centernext to theTokyo Dome, dubbed by one newspaper as a "colossal Pez candy dispenser", has a free observation deck on the 25th floor offering an iconic view of Shinjuku against Mt. Fuji on a clear day.

The city is dotted with museums, large and small, which center on every possible interest from pens to antique clocks to traditional and modern arts. Many of the largest museums are clustered around Ueno. At ¥500 to ¥1,000 or more, entrance fees can add up quickly.

RidingSky Bus Tokyo, an open-top double-decker operated by Hinomaru Limousine (every hour between 10:00 and 18:00), is a good option to take a quick tour around the city center. The 45 minutes bus ride on the "T-01 course" will take you around the Imperial Palace via Ginza and Marunouchi district, showing the highlight of Tokyo's shopping and business center. The fare is ¥1,500 for adults of 12 years old and over, and ¥700 for children between 4 and 11 years old. You can borrow a multi-language voice guide system free of charge upon purchasing a ticket, subject to stock availability. Four other bus courses are offered, including a night trip to Odaiba, but those trips are conducted in Japanese with no foreign language guidance.

Other tour companies catering to foreign tourists offer bus tours with English guidance – JTB is an excellent example.

The[[Tokyo/Sumida|Tokyo SkyTree]](¥2,060-3,090) is Tokyo's latest attraction, not to mention it's also the second-tallest structure in the world, soaring to more than 2000 feet above the ground. However, its location away from downtown means the view is a distant jumble of buildings.

The more familiarTokyo Toweris still around. At ¥820-1,420, it's not as expensive as its newest rival, but neither is the view as good as some alternatives.

For a view that's light on your wallet, head to theTokyo Metropolitan Governmentbuildings (in effect, Tokyo's City Hall) in [[Tokyo/Shinjuku|Shinjuku]]. Its twin towers have viewing platforms that are absolutely free, and offer a great view over Tokyo and beyond.

TheWorld Trade Center Building(10:00-20:00, or 21:00 in July and August, ¥620) at JR Hamamatsucho station offers stunning views of Tokyo Tower and the waterfront due to its excellent location, especially at dusk.

[[Tokyo/Roppongi|Tokyo City View]]has an observation deck with great views of Tokyo Bay and downtown Tokyo including the nearby Tokyo Tower – admission is a steep ¥1,800-2,300, but includes admission to theMori Art Museum.

TheRainbow Bridgelinking Tokyo to [[Tokyo/Odaiba|Odaiba]] is another good option, if you don't mind traffic noise and smell. The bridge's pedestrian walkways (open until 20:00 at night) are free, and the night-time view across Tokyo Bay is impressive.

TheBunkyo Civic Centernext to the Tokyo Dome, dubbed by one newspaper as a "colossal Pez candy dispenser", has a free observation deck on the 25th floor offering an iconic view of Shinjuku against Mt. Fuji on a clear day.

  • See thetuna auctionat the Toyosu Market and eat asushi breakfastat the former Tsukiji Fish Market.
  • Take a boat ride on theSumida Riverfrom Asakusa.
  • Lose yourself in the dazzling neon jungle outside major train stations in the evenings. Shibuya and east Shinjuku at night can make Times Square or Piccadilly Circus look rural in comparison — it has to be seen to be believed.
  • Enjoy a soak in a local "sento" or public bath. Or one of the onsen theme parks such asLaQuaat theTokyo Dome(Bunkyo) orOedo Onsen Monogatariin Odaiba.
  • Go to an amusement park such asTokyo Disney Resort, which consists ofTokyo DisneylandandTokyo DisneySeawhich are Asia's most visited and second most visited theme parks respectively, or the more JapaneseSanrio Puroland(in Tama), home to more Hello Kitties than you can imagine.
  • Join and bar hop or pub crawl along with events groups in Roppongi,
  • Check out the hip and young crowd at Harajuku'sTakeshita-Dori (Takeshita Street) or the more grown upOmotesando.
  • In the spring, take a boatride in Kichijoji's lovelyInokashira Park, and afterwards visit the Ghibli Studios Museum (well known for their amazing movies, like Spirited Away, and Princess Mononoke), but you will need to buy tickets for these in advance at a Lawson convenience store.
  • Take theYurikamomeelevated train across the bay bridge from Shimbashi station to the bayside Odaiba district, and go on the giant ferris wheel — at one time the largest in the world.
  • Watch a baseball game, namely the Yomiuri Giants at theTokyo Dome, or the Tokyo Yakult Swallows at Jingu Stadium. Nearby Chiba hosts the Chiba Lotte Marines.
  • Take a stroll through the Imperial Palace's East Gardens (open to the public daily at 09:00, except Fridays and Mondays).
  • Have a picnic in a park during the cherry blossom (Sakura). Unfortunately Sakura only lasts for about a week in Spring. But be warned, parks are usually very crowded during this time.
  • Join a local for a short lunch or dinner homestay withNagomi Visit'shome visit program or participate in their cooking classes.
  • Raising a glass in this colourful nightlife at Shinjuku district.
  • Joining the Harajuku's eccentric fashion tribes as they shop.
  • Losing yourself in the vestiges of the old city Yanesen.
  • Akihabara — Venturing into the belly of pop culture beast.

  • Sanja Matsuri(三社祭), third weekend in May. Tokyo's largest festival, held near Sensoji Temple in Asakusa, this three-day extravaganza sees up to 2 million people turn out to watch the parade of portable shrines (mikoshi) with music, dancing and geisha performances.
  • Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival(隅田川花火大会Sumidagawa Hanabi Taikai), fourth Saturday in July. Huge fireworks competition that sees up to a million people line the banks of the Sumida River.

Sanja Matsuri(三社祭), third weekend in May. Tokyo's largest festival, held near Sensoji Temple in [[Tokyo/Asakusa|Asakusa]], this three-day extravaganza sees up to 2 million people turn out to watch the parade of portable shrines (mikoshi) with music, dancing and geisha performances.

Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival(隅田川花火大会Sumidagawa Hanabi Taikai), fourth Saturday in July. Huge fireworks competition that sees up to a million people line the banks of the Sumida River.

See thetuna auctionat the [[Tokyo/East|Toyosu Market]] and eat asushi breakfastat the former [[Tokyo/Chuo|Tsukiji Fish Market]].

Take a boat ride on theSumida Riverfrom [[Tokyo/Asakusa|Asakusa]].

Enjoy a soak in a local "sento" or public bath. Or one of the onsen theme parks such asLaQuaat the Tokyo Dome ([[Tokyo/Bunkyo|Bunkyo]]) orOedo Onsen Monogatariin [[Tokyo/Odaiba|Odaiba]].

Go to an amusement park such as [[Tokyo Disney Resort]], which consists ofTokyo DisneylandandTokyo DisneySeawhich are Asia's most visited and second most visited theme parks respectively, or the more JapaneseSanrio Puroland(in [[Tokyo/Tama|Tama]]), home to more Hello Kitties than you can imagine.

Check out the hip and young crowd at [[Tokyo/Harajuku|Harajuku]]'sTakeshita-Dori(Takeshita Street) or the more grown upOmotesando.

In the spring, take a boatride in [[Tokyo/Kichijoji|Kichijoji]]'s lovelyInokashira Park, and afterwards visit the Ghibli Studios Museum (well known for their amazing movies, like Spirited Away, and Princess Mononoke), but you will need to buy tickets for these in advance at a Lawson convenience store.

Kitsch-o-rama at the Nakamise arcade, Asakusa

Tokyo is one of the fashion and cosmetic centers in the Eastern world. Items to look for include electronics, funky fashions, antique furniture and kimono, as well as specialty items like Hello Kitty goods, anime and comics and their associated paraphernalia. Tokyo has some of the largest electronic industries in the world, such as Sony, Panasonic, and Toshiba etc.

Cash payment is the norm. Most Japanese ATMs donotaccept foreign cards, but post office, 7-Eleven and ones from large banks do and usually have English menus as well (Mitsubishi-UFJ ATMs accept UnionPay and Discover card users, while Mitsui-Sumitomo allows the use of UnionPay cards for a ¥75 surcharge regardless of time of day). Most ATMs only give ¥10,000 notes (such as 711 and convenience stores). However, some ATMs do give ¥1,000 notes (at the airport and large banks). Althoughcredit cardsare more and more widely accepted, they are far less widespread than in most other developed countries. The crime rate is very low, so don't be afraid of carrying around wads of cash as the Japanese do. The average Japanese citizen will carry a month's worth of expenses on them (around ¥40,000 give or take). SeeBuyunder Japan. for general caveats regarding electronics and media compatibility.

There are numerous convenience stores throughout Tokyo (such as Seven-eleven, Lawsons, and Family-Mart), which are open around the clock and sell not only food and magazines, but also daily necessities such as underwear and toiletries. Supermarkets are usually open until 22:00, while drugstores and department stores usually close at 21:00.

Akihabara, Tokyo's Electric Town, is now also the unquestioned center of itsotakucommunity, and the stores along Chuo-dori are packed to the rafters withanime(animation) andmanga(comics). Another popular district for all things manga/anime is the Nakano ward and its Broadway Shopping arkade. Check out the mandarake shop for loads of used and rare mangas.

There has been an "otaku boom" in Akihabara. A lot of attention in particular was paid to the town thanks to the popular Japanese drama "Densha Otoko", a (true) love story about an otaku who saves a woman from a molester on a train and their subsequent courtship.

Akihabara was previously known for its many live performances andcosplayers, some of which had drawn negative attention due to extremist performers. These have become increasingly scarce following theAkihabara massacrein 2008, although girls in various maid costumes can still be seen standing along the streets handing out advertisement fliers to passers by forMaid Cafes.

Serious collectors should head for theAntique Mallin Ginza or theAntique Marketin Omotesando, which despite the rustic names are collections of small very specialist shops (samurai armor,ukiyo-eprints, etc. ) with head-spinning prices. Mere mortals can venture over to Nishi-Ogikubo, where you can pick up scrolls of calligraphy and such for a few thousand yen.

TheAntique Festival(全国古民具骨董祭り) is held over the weekend about 5-6 times a year at the Tokyo Ryutsu Center, on the Tokyo Monorail line, and is well worth a visit.

Jinbocho is to used books what Akihabara is to electronics. It's clustered around the Jinbocho subway stop. The Blue Parrot is another shop at Takadanobaba on the Yamanote line, just two stops north of Shinjuku.

Ever since Sony and Nikon became synonymous with high-tech quality, Tokyo has been a favored place for buying electronics and cameras. Though the lines have blurred since the PC revolution, each has its traditional territory and stores: Akihabara has the electronics stores, including a large number of duty-free shops specializing in export models, and Shinjuku has the camera stores. Unfortunately, local model electronics are not cheap, but the export models are similar to what you'll pay back home. you can sometimes find cheap local models if you avoid big shops and check smaller retailers. It's also surprisingly difficult to find certain things e.g. games machines.

Shibuya and neighboring Harajuku are the best-known shopping areas for funky, youthful clothes and accessories. Almost without exception, clothes are sized for the petite Japanese frame.

Department stores and exclusive boutiques stock every fashion label imaginable, but for global labels prices in Tokyo are typically higher than anywhere else in the world. The famous Ginza and Ikebukuro's giantSeibuandTobudepartment stores (the largest in the world) are good hunting grounds. Roppongi Hills has emerged as a popular area for high-end shopping, with many major global brands. Other department stores in Tokyo areMitsukoshi, Sogo, Marui(OIOI),Matsuzakaya, Isetan, MatsuyaandTakashimaya. Mitsukoshi is Japan's biggest department store chain. Its anchor store is in Nihonbashi.Marui Menstore in Shinjuku has eight floors of high-end fashion for men only.

The district for this isKappabashi Streetnear Asakusa, also known as “Kitchen Town.” The street is lined with stores selling all kinds of kitchen wares — this is where the restaurants of Tokyo get their supplies. It's also a great place to findcheap Japanese ceramics, not to mention plastic food!

Ochanomizu is to the guitar what Jinbocho is to used books. There, you’ll find what must be the world’s densest collection of guitar shops. Plenty of other musical instruments (though not traditional Japanese ones) are also available.

For touristy Japanese knickknacks, the best places to shop areNakamisein Asakusa and theOriental Bazaarin Omotesando, which stock all the kitschy things likekanji-emblazoned T-shirts, foreigner-sized kimonos, ninja outfits for kids and ersatz samurai swords that can be surprisingly difficult to find elsewhere. Both also have a selection of serious antiques for the connoisseur, but see also Antiques above.

Bustling open-air bazaars in the Asian style are rare in Tokyo, except for Ueno'sAmeyoko, a legacy of the postwar occupation.Yanaka Ginzain the Shitamachi Taito district, a very nice example of a neighborhood shopping street, makes for an interesting afternoon browse.

There are often small flea and antique markets in operation on the weekend at major (and minor) shrines in and around Tokyo.

Red lanterns beckoning customers in TsukishimaVisitors from Western countries may be surprised to find that despite its justified reputation for being an expensive city, eating out in Tokyo can be surprisingly affordable. While fine dining establishments in Tokyo can be some of the most expensive in the world, at the budget end of the spectrum, it is fairly easy to find a basic rice or noodle joint serving up meals starting from ¥300; a price that is unmatched even by McDonald's or other fast food chains in the West.

Tokyo has a large quantity and variety of food. Department stores have food halls, typically in the basement, with food which is comparable to top delicatessans in other world cities (though mostly Japanese and Japanized foreign food). Some basements of train stations have supermarkets with free taste testers. It's a great way to sample some of the strange dishes they have for free. Tokyo has a large number of restaurants, so see the main Japan guide for the types of food you will encounter and some popular chains. Menus are often posted outside, so you can check the prices. Some shops have the famous plastic food in their front windows. Don't hesitate to drag the waiting staff out to the front to point at what you want. Always carry cash. Many restaurants will not accept credit cards.

Tokyo has tens of thousands of restaurants representing many cuisines in the world, though sometimes adjusted for local tastes, but it also offers a few unique local specialties. Within Japan, Tokyo cuisine is best known for 3 dishes: sushi, tempura, and unagi (freshwater eel).Nigirizushi(fish pressed onto rice), known around the world around simply as "sushi," in fact originates from Tokyo, and within Japan is known asEdo-mae zushi(Edo-style sushi). Another ismonjayaki(もんじゃ焼き), a gooey, cabbage-filled version ofokonomiyakithat uses a very thin batter to achieve a sticky, caramelized consistency. It is originally from the Tsukishima area of Chuo and today there are many restaurants near Asakusa offering monjayaki.

  • Hot PepperAvailable in various editions, by region, around Tokyo, this free magazine offers a guide to local restaurants in Japanese but provides pictures and maps to the restaurants. Some restaurants even offer coupons. Most restaurants within this magazine are on the mid-range to high end scale.

Stand-and-eat (tachigui) noodle shop with ticket vending machine

Go to aconvenience store (konbini), there is one on every second corner. Really, the options may surprise you. You can get rice balls (onigiri), bread-rolls, salads, prepared foods (likenikumanandoden), and drinks (both hot and cold) for ¥100-150,bentōlunch boxes for around ¥500 and sandwiches for ¥250-350. At most convenience stores, microwaves are available to heat up your food for no additional cost.Supermarkets (sūpā) are usually cheaper and offer a wider choice, but are more difficult to find. (Try Asakusa and the sidestreets of Ueno's Ameyoko market for local—not big chain—supermarkets.). LIFE supermarket is a good place to buy discount food after 8pm. Also,¥100 shops (hyaku-en shoppu) have become very common, and most have a selection of convenient, ready to eat items. There are ¥100 shops near most minor train stations, and usually tucked away somewhere within two or three blocks of the big stations. In particular, look for the "99" and "Lawson 100" signs; these chains are essentially small grocery stores.

Also, look forbentōshops like Hokka-Hokka-Tei which sell take-out lunch boxes. They range in quality and cost, but most offer good, basic food at a reasonable price. This is what students and office workers often eat.

Noodle shops, curry shops, and bakeries are often the best option for people eating on the cheap. They are everywhere. Thenoodle barson every corner are great for filling up and are very cheap at ¥200–1000. You buy your meal ticket from a vending machine at the door with pictures of the dishes and hand it to the serving staff. The one question you will typically have to answer for the counterman is whether you wantsoba(そば) (thin brown buckwheat) orudon(うどん) (thick white wheat) noodles. Some offer standing room only with a counter to place your bowl, while others have limited counter seating. During peak times, you need to be quick as others will be waiting. Pseudo Chinese-styleramen(ラーメン) (yellow wheat and egg noodles) are a little more expensive and typically sold in specialist shops, with prices starting from ¥400, but are typically served in very flavourful pork or chicken broth that has been boiled overnight. Tokyo is generally known among the Japanese forshoyu ramen, in which soy sauce is used to add flavour to the pork broth.

Fast food is available just about everywhere, including many American chains like McDonald's and KFC. But if you are visiting Japan from overseas, and wish to sample Japanese fast food, why not tryMOS Burger, Freshness Burger, Lotteria, orFirst Kitchen? If you're looking for something more Japanese, try one of the local fast food giants,Matsuya, Yoshinoya, andSukiya, which specialize in donburi: a giant bowl of meat, rice, and vegetables, sometimes with egg thrown in for good measure, starting at below ¥300 for the flagshipgyūdon(beef bowl). Another good option isoyako don(chicken and egg bowl, literally “mother and child bowl”), which the somewhat smaller chainNakauspecializes in. Drinking water or hotocha(Japanese green tea) is usually available at no extra cost. There are also a number of tempura chains, with some budget options. More upscale but still affordable and rather more interesting, isOotoya, which serves up a larger variety of home-style cooking for under ¥1000.Yayoi-kenis a chain of eateries servingteishoku, complete set meals: buy a ticket from the machine, and you'll get miso soup, main course (fish or meat, often with vegetables), rice (bottomless, just ask for refills), a small hunk of fresh tofu, pickles and tea, and still be left with some change from your ¥1000.

Raw fish enthusiasts are urged to trykaitenzushi(conveyor belt sushi), where the prices can be very reasonable. Prices do depend on the color of the plate, however, and some items are very expensive, so be sure to check before they start to pile up.

A great option for a quick bite or for groups isyakitori(grilled chicken) – individual skewers are often below ¥100.

Many of the larger train and subway stations have fast, cheap eateries. Around most stations, there will be ample choices of places to eat, including chain coffeeshops (which often serve sandwiches, baked goods, and pasta dishes), yakitori places, and even Italian restaurants.

There are a great many excellent and affordable lunch choices in busier neighborhoods like Shibuya and Shinjuku, especially during the week – expect to spend about ¥1000 (without drinks) for a meal.

By tradition the basement of almost any department store, including Mitsukoshi, Matsuzakaya, or Isetan, is devoted to thedepachika(デパ地下), a huge array of small shops selling all kinds of prepared take-out food. You can assemble a delicious if slightly pricey picnic here – or, if you're feeling really cheap, just go around eating free samples! The very largest department stores are Tobu and Seibu in Ikebukuro, but Shibuya, Ginza and in fact any major Tokyo district will have their fair share. Shinjuku Station is home to several famous department stores, such as the Keio and Odakyu department stores. Many stores begin discounting their selections at about 19:00 each night. Look for signs and stickers indicating specific yen value or percentage discounts. You will often see half-price stickers which read 半値 (hanne). This discounting is also common at supermarkets at the smaller stations, although the quality may be a notch or two down from the department stores, it's still perfectly edible.

The ubiquitousizakaya, a cross between a pub and a casual restaurant, invariably serve a good range of Japanese dishes and can be good places to fill up without breaking the bank: in most, an evening of eating and drinking won't cost more than around ¥3000 per person. See Drink for details.

There is a great variety of restaurants serving Tokyo’s world-famous sushi at every price point, with fish fresh from Toyosu, the world’s largest fish market. It is possible to get sushi for as little as ¥100/piece or less (at chain stores), or spend upwards of ¥10,000 yen (at elegant Ginza restaurants), but a typical spend is ¥3000–¥4000, depending on selection (drinks extra). Usuallyomakase(chef’s choice) gives a good deal and selection, to which you can add a piece or two a la carte if desired. A popular choice with tourists is a sushi breakfast at Tsukiji, former home of the fish market, particularly for one’s jet-lagged first morning, or after a night out partying. Most sushi shops in the outer market of Tsukiji open at 8 or 9AM, though there are some 24-hour shops, and particularly popular are two small stores in the inner market that open before 6AM and feature market ambience and very long queues; see Chuo: Mid-range dining.

The best-known tempura chain is Tsunahachi, where depending on the store you can pay from below ¥1000 for lunch to over ¥6000 for dinner.

A classic modern Japanese dish istonkatsu(“pork cutlet”), and there are good Tokyo options; the fattier loin (ロース “roast”) is generally considered tastier than the leaner fillet (hireヒレ). The most famous restaurant is Tonki, right by Meguro station (1-1-2 Shimo-Meguro, Meguro-ku, Tokyo), serving a standard meal at about ¥1600, dinner only (from 4PM). While it is an institution with a loyal clientele (and frequent lines), and decidedly has atmosphere (similar to an established New York deli), the food gets mixed reviews, and is less succulent than other options – an interesting experience, however. Next most famous is the chainMaisen(まい泉), which serves delicious if somewhat expensive tonkatsu (various varieties and seasonal options) atmany locations in Tokyo, most notably at their flagship shop in Aoyama by Omotesandō station (Jingumae 4-8-5, closing at 7PM). The top-end dish is Okita Kurobuta (Berkshire pork by Mr. Okita), at ¥3,800 for a meal, though they have cheaper options. A modern option isButagumi, at Nishi-Azabu 2-24-9 (west of Roppongi station), serving a variety of premium pork brands expertly prepared.

Tokyo also has a large number of Korean restaurants, generally midrange, and manyyakiniku(grilled meat) restaurants are Korean-influenced.

Tokyo has the world's highest number of Michelin-starred restaurants, with prices to match. For upmarket Japanese eats, Ginza is guaranteed to burn a hole in your wallet, with Akasaka and Roppongi Hills close behind. Top-end restaurants are primarily Japanese, with a few French. Tokyo is widely regarded as the spiritual home of a fine style of sushi known asedomae-zushi(江戸前寿司). Besides sushi, Tokyo's fine dining scene also includes Japanese contemporary, tempura andkaiseki. You can limit the damage considerably by eating fixed lunch sets instead of dinner, as this is when restaurants cater to people paying their own meals instead of using the company expense account. However, Tokyo's fine dining scene is notoriously inaccessible to foreign visitors, as most establishments do not accept reservations from new customers; you will need to be introduced by one of their regular diners in order to dine there. That said, it is possible to book a spot at some of these establishments through your hotel concierge if you do so many months in advance, though only the most expensive luxury hotels will have the necessary clout to do this. Also keep in mind that many fine dining establishments do not accept credit cards, and you will be expected to pay for your mealin cash.

There are four 3-star sushi restaurants in Tokyo, of which the most famous internationally isSukiyabashi Jiro (home), due to the movieJiro Dreams of Sushi;reservations must be made on the 1st day of the preceding month, as they book up that day, and dinner is from ¥30,000. The cheapest of these top sushi restaurants is Saitō Sushi (+81 3 3589 4412), where a small lunch can be had for as little as ¥5,000.

Hot PepperAvailable in various editions, by region, around Tokyo, this free magazine offers a guide to local restaurants in Japanese but provides pictures and maps to the restaurants. Some restaurants even offer coupons. Most restaurants within this magazine are on the mid-range to high end scale.

Roppongi at night, with Tokyo Tower in the distance

The party never stops in Tokyo (at least in the karaoke bars), and you will find good little bars and restaurants everywhere.

The most Japanese way to spend a night out as an individual or in a small group would be at Japanese-style watering holes calledizakaya(居酒屋), which offer food and drink in a convivial, pub-like atmosphere (see Japan for details). Cheaper chainizakayalikeTsubohachi(つぼ八) andShirokiya(白木屋) usually have picture menus, so ordering is simple, even if you don't know Japanese – but don't be surprised if some places have Japanese only touchscreen ordering systems.

Another common option, which is often unbelievable to non-Japanese ears, is “all you can drink” (nomihōdai,飲み放題), where you can drink all you want from a fixed menu for 90 minutes or 120 minutes. This is aimed at group parties, and is generally paired with a meal, often “all you can eat” (tabehōdai,食べ放題), often in a private room. Receiving the items ordered will depend on how often your servers decide to bring out these items, which means you may be "throttled" to an extent, and may feel less than a true "all you can drink/eat" experience. This depends on the establishment. There are also a number of cheap bars where you can get a drink for ¥300 or even cheaper.

Tokyo’s most distinctive drink is Hoppy (hoppi,ホッピー), a virtually non-alcoholic beer-flavored drink (0.8% alcohol), which is drunk by mixing with shōchū (at 25%) at a 5:1 ratio, yielding an about 5% alcohol drink, essentially a substitute beer. This is available in older izakaya and has experienced a retro revival of late, though it is not particularly tasty. Another distinctively Tokyo drink is Denki Bran (電気ブラン, “electric brandy”), a herb-flavored brandy available (to drink in or in bottles) at the Kamiya bar (神谷バー) in Asakusa, right at the main intersection by the metro station.

The major brands of beer are widely available, typically ¥500–¥800 per glass or bottle, but microbrews and foreign beer are only rarely available and often very expensive. You’re generally better off getting bottles of microbrews at speciality stores.Popeyein Ryōgoku is a rare exception, with 70 beers on tap! Another popular choice is Beer Station at Ebisu, serving a variety of Yebisu beers and matching German food.

For a splurge on a beverage or two, Western Shinjuku'sPark Hyatt Tokyohouses theNew York Baron level 52. Providing stunning views day and night across Tokyo, it was also the setting for the movieLost in Translation. Cocktails here start around ¥1400 – single malt whiskies are upwards of ¥2000. Amazing cocktails, served in “tasting flights” of 4 or 6 drinks, are made byGen Yamamotoat his bar in Azabu-Jūban, at about ¥6000 for 6 drinks (a la carte cocktails are available in larger pours for ¥1600–¥1800).

Visiting clubs and western-style night spots can get expensive, with clubs and live houses enforcing weekend cover charges in the ¥2000–5000 bracket (usually including a drink coupon or two).

If you're new in town, Roppongi has establishments which specialize in serving foreigners – but it's also overflowing with foreigners, hostesses, and 'patrons' who will continually hassle you to visit their gentlemen's clubs, where drinks cost ¥5000 and up. Many Japanese and foreigners avoid this area, preferring the clubs and bars in Shibuya instead, or trendy Ginza, Ebisu, or Shinjuku.

The Hub, a chain of British-style pubs, has branches in Shinjuku, Shibuya, and Roppongi (as well as near most major stations) and is reasonably priced and popular among foreigners and Japanese alike. Other British/Irish pubs can be found in Roppongi, Shinjuku and Shibuya. Expect to pay around ¥1000 a pint, although happy hours can reduce this by a few hundred yen.

In Shibuya, the bar area behind 109 (not 109-2) and next to Dogenzaka ("Love Hotel Hill") has a large number of clubs. Unlike those in Roppongi and Shibuya's Gas Panic, these clubs have entrance fees, but clubs without entrance fees often hassle you all night to buy drinks which ends up just as expensive and without people who are actually there to enjoy the music. Shinjuku is home to Kabukichō, Japan's largest red-light district. Also in Shinjuku is the gay bar district of Shinjuku-nichome. A little further from the city center are Shimokitazawa, Koenji and Nakano, full of good bars, restaurants and "live houses" offering underground/indie music popular with students and 20/30-somethings.

  • Tokyo MetroAbout 100 metro (not JR) stations have free Wi-Fi, with SSID "Metro_Free_Wi-Fi" or "Toei_Subway_Free_Wi-Fi", email registration necessary.
  • 7 SPOT (Japanese Website)Seven-Eleven convenience stores and Dennys restaurants offer Free Wifi service. "7SPOT" to take advantage of member registration (free) can be used for up to 60 minutes per one login is required, you can access up to three times a day.Registration Page(Japanese)
  • FreeSpotFreeSpot offering free wireless Internet access, check out their maps of service areas
  • Free Wi-Fi JapanVisitors to Japan can use NTT East Free Wi-Fi for up to 14 days, completely free of charge, on presentation of your passport. You can enjoy free Wi-Fi in half of Japan through just one ID.

Tokyo MetroAbout 100 metro (not JR) stations have free Wi-Fi, with SSID "Metro_Free_Wi-Fi" or "Toei_Subway_Free_Wi-Fi", email registration necessary.

7 SPOT (Japanese Website)Seven-Eleven convenience stores and Dennys restaurants offer Free Wifi service. "7SPOT" to take advantage of member registration (free) can be used for up to 60 minutes per one login is required, you can access up to three times a day.Registration Page(Japanese)

FreeSpotFreeSpot offering free wireless Internet access, check out their maps of service areas

Free Wi-Fi JapanVisitors to Japan can use NTT East Free Wi-Fi for up to 14 days, completely free of charge, on presentation of your passport. You can enjoy free Wi-Fi in half of Japan through just one ID.

  • HOTSPOTNTT Communications WiFi Service. ¥500/24h

HOTSPOTNTT Communications WiFi Service. ¥500/24h

Good connections are available at Internet cafes everywhere. Expect to pay ¥400-¥500 per hour. "Gera Gera" is a popular chain. Paid WiFi service is also taking off in Tokyo with reasonable coverage – at a price. WiFi services are probably not convenient for those just visiting.

If you bring your own computer with a WLAN card, it is possible to find wireless connections in fast food outlets like McDonald's or Mos Burger. You also have a good chance to find a connection in one of the numerous coffee shops. Just look for a wireless connection sign in the front window or computers within the shop. Free wireless is not nearly as prevalent in Japan as it is in the West.

Foreigners are forbidden from buying disposable "burner" mobile phones and SIM cards, but it is possible to rent mobile phones, SIM Cards, and portable wifi hotspots.

  • Rentafone JapanRents basic mobile phones with texting, calling, and mobile internet service.
  • eConnectRents "WiFi-To-Go" mobile hot spots, for ¥ 432 - 1,080 / day and prepaid data-only SIM Cards lasting as long as 30 days.

Rentafone JapanRents basic mobile phones with texting, calling, and mobile internet service.

eConnectRents "WiFi-To-Go" mobile hot spots, for ¥ 432 - 1,080 / day and prepaid data-only SIM Cards lasting as long as 30 days.

Tokyo is probably one of the safest big cities you will ever visit, and Japan in general is one of the safest places to visit in the world. Most people, including single female travellers, would not encounter any problems walking along the streets alone at night. Street crime is extremely rare, even late at night, and continues to decrease. However,"little crime" does not mean "no crime", and common sense should still be applied as anywhere in the world. Often the biggest risk is travellers taking Japan's visibly apparent lack of crime too close to heart and doing things they would never do back home.

The most common crime is sexual harassment on crowded trains, pressed up against each other, hands wander. This is more of a local problem as westerners are considered more aggressive and would stick up for themselves. The best way to deal with any wandering hands is to yell "Chikan!" which is the Japanese term for "pervert".

Small police stations, orkōban(交番), can be found every few blocks. If you get lost or need assistance, by all means go to them; it's their job to help you! They have great maps of the surrounding area, and are happy to give directions. They may, however, have difficulties with English, so some knowledge of the Japanese language helps.

Take the usual precautions against pickpockets in crowded areas and trains. Also, theft is more likely to occur in hangouts and bars popular with travellers and non-residents.

The red-light and nightlife districts can be a bit seedy, but are rarely dangerous. Some small, back-street drinking establishments in red-light districts have been known to charge extortionate prices. Similar problems exist in the seedier upscale clubs in Roppongi, where it may be wise to check cover charges and drink prices in advance.

In September 2014, adengueepidemic outbreak infected several hundred people in Tokyo, and led the authorities to close down several parks in the Shinjuku district.

Still in a jam? CallTokyo English Life Line, tel. 03-5774-0992, daily 09:00-23:00.

If you make it as far out as the Izu Islands, visitors to Miyakejima Island are required to carry a gas mask, due to volcanic gases. Those in poor health are advised against travelling to the island. In addition, Tokyo, like the rest of Japan is at risk for earthquakes.

  • Tokyo Metropolitan Health and Medical Information Center, +81 3-5285-8181. 09:00-20:00. Information about medical institutions as well as about the medical and health insurance system in Japan. (English/Chinese/Korean/Thai/Spanish)
  • Emergency Translation Services, +81 3-5285-8185. Weekdays:17:00-20:00,Weekends and Holidays:09:00-20:00. Interpretation service through phone is also available for foreign patients visiting a hospital if their treatment is not going to be carried out smoothly because of language difficulty. (for medical purpose. English/Chinese/Korean/Thai/Spanish)

Tokyo Metropolitan Health and Medical Information Center, +81 3-5285-8181. 09:00-20:00. Information about medical institutions as well as about the medical and health insurance system in Japan. (English/Chinese/Korean/Thai/Spanish)

Emergency Translation Services, +81 3-5285-8185. Weekdays:17:00-20:00,Weekends and Holidays:09:00-20:00. Interpretation service through phone is also available for foreign patients visiting a hospital if their treatment is not going to be carried out smoothly because of language difficulty. (for medical purpose. English/Chinese/Korean/Thai/Spanish)

  • chezvous.
  • Kinder-Network, +81 3-6415-8271.
  • Babysitters, +81 45-507-1888.

chezvous.

Kinder-Network, +81 3-6415-8271.

Babysitters, +81 45-507-1888.

Tokyo is the most accessible city in Japan with over 90% of the train stations being wheelchair accessible, along with most tourist attractions. Crowding on trains can be difficult for some people, but wheelchair spaces are available.

Finding accessible restaurants can be hard to access since they often have steps or are very small. Department stores often have accessible restaurants on the top floors.

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  • EgyptEgypt, 1-5-4 Aobadai Meguro-ku, +81 3 3770-8022.
  • El SalvadorEl Salvador, No.38 Kowa Building 803 4-12-24 Nishi-Azabu Minato-ku, +81 3 3499-4461.
  • EritreaEritrea, 401 4-7-4 Shirokanedai Minato-ku, +81 3 5791-1815.
  • EstoniaEstonia, 2-6-15 Jingu-mae Shibuya-ku, +81 3 5412-7281.
  • EthiopiaEthiopia, Takanawa Kaisei Bldg. 2F 3-4-1 Takanawa Minato-ku, +81 3 5420-6860.
  • FinlandFinland, 3-5-39, Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8561, +81 3-5447 6000. Mo-Fr 9AM-noon, 1PM-5:15PM.
  • FranceFrance, 4-11-44, Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku 106-8518, +81 3 5798 6000.
  • GeorgiaGeorgia, Residence Viscountess, №220 1-11-36 Akasaka, Minato-ku, 107-0052, +81 3 5575-6091.
  • GermanyGermany, 4-5-10 Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku, 106-0047, +81 3 5791-7700.
  • GreeceGreece, 3-16-30 Nishi Azabu, Minato Ku, Tokyo 106-0031, +81 3-3403-0871, +81 3-3403-0872.
  • Hong KongHong Kong, 30-1 Sanban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, 102-0075, +81 3 3556-8980.
  • IcelandIceland, 4-18-26 Takanawa Minato-ku, +81 3 3447-1944.
  • IndiaIndia, 2-2-11 Kudan-Minami, Chiyoda-ku (Nearest subway station is Kudanshita - 九段下駅, +81 3 3262-2391. 0900 hours to 1730 hours (Monday to Friday).
  • IndonesiaIndonesia, 5-2-9 Higashi Gotanda, Shinagawa-ku, +81 3 3441-4201.
  • IrelandIreland, 2-10-7 Kojimachi Chiyoda-ku, +81 3 3263-0695.
  • LuxembourgLuxembourg, 8-9 Yonbancho, Chiyoda-ku 102-0081, +81 3 3265 9621.
  • MalaysiaMalaysia, 20-16 Nanpeidai-Cho Shibuya-Ku, +81 3 3476-3840.
  • MexicoMexico, 2-15-1 Nagatacho, Chiyoda-ku, +81 3 3580-2961. M-F 09:00-17:00.
  • MoroccoMorocco, 5-4-30 Minamiaoyama, 107-0052, +81 3 5485-7171.
  • the NetherlandsNetherlands, 3-6-3 Shibakoen, Minato-ku, +81 3 5776-5400. M-F 09:00-17:30.
  • New ZealandNew Zealand, New Zealand Embassy, Tokyo, 20-40 Kamiyama-cho, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0047, +81 3 3467-2271.
  • PakistanPakistan, +81 3 5421-7741.
  • PanamaPanama, Room 805, No. 38 Kowa Building, 4-12-24 Nishi Azabu, Minato-ku, 106-0031, +81 3 3499-3741.
  • PeruPeru, 2-3-1 Hiroo, Shibuya-ku, 150-0012, +81 3 3406-4243.
  • PhilippinesPhilippines, 5-15-5 Roppongi, Minato-ku, 106-8537, +81 3 5562-1600. M-F 09:00-18:00.
  • PolandPoland, 2-13-5 Mita, Meguro-ku, 153-0062, +81 3 5794-7020.
  • PortugalPortugal, Kamiura Kojimachi Bldg. 4F, 3-10-3, Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 Japan (Cultural and Consular); Burex Kojimachi 901, 3-5-2, Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 Japan (Comercial Section) (Kamiura Kojimachi Bldg. 5F 3-10-3, Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083, +81 3 5212-7322.
  • SerbiaSerbia, 4-7-24 Kitashinagawa, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 140-0001, +81 3 3447-3571. Mon - Fri 9:30AM to 17PM.
  • SingaporeSingapore, 5-1-3 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032, +81 3 3586-9111. Mon - Fri 9:30AM to 12PM, 2PM to 5PM.
  • South KoreaSouth Korea, 1-2-5 Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0047, +81 3 3455-2601. Mon - Fri 9AM to 11.30AM, 2PM to 4PM.
  • SpainSpain, 1-3-29 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032 (1-3-29 Roppongi Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032, +81 3 3583-8531.
  • SwitzerlandSwitzerland, 5-9-12 Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8589, +81 3-5449-8400.
  • TaiwanTaiwan, 5-20-2 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku Tokyo 108-0071, +81 3 3280-7811. 9AM to 11.30AM, 1PM to 5PM.
  • TajikistanTajikistan, 1-4-43 Nishi-Azabu Minato-ku, +81 3 6804-3660.
  • TanzaniaTanzania, 4-21-9 Kamiyoga Setagaya-ku, +81 3 3425-4531.
  • ThailandThailand, 2-2-1 Kudan-Minami Chiyoda-ku, +81 3 3222-4101.
  • TunisiaTunisia, 3-6-6 Kudanminami, Chiyoda-ku 102-0074, +81 3 3511 6622.
  • TurkeyTurkey, 2-33-6 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, +81 3 6439-5700.
  • UgandaUganda, 9-23 Hachiyama-cho Shibuya-ku, +81 3 3462-7107.
  • UkraineUkraine, 3-5-31 Nishi-Azabu Minato-ku, +81 3 5474-9770.
  • the United Arab EmiratesUnited Arab Emirates, 9-10 Nanpeidai-cho Shibuya-ku, +81 3 5489-0804.
  • the United KingdomUnited Kingdom, 1 Ichiban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, 102-8381, +81 3 5211-1100.
  • the United StatesUnited States, 1-10-5 Akasaka Minato-ku, 107-8420, +81 3 3224-5000.
  • UruguayUruguay, No.38 Kowa Building 908 4-12-24 Nishi-Azabu Minato-ku, +81 3 3486-1888.
  • UzbekistanUzbekistan, 5-11-8 Shimomeguro Meguro-ku, +81 3 3224-5000.
  • VenezuelaVenezuela, Room 703, No.38 Kowa Building 703 4-12-24 Nishi-Azabu Minato-ku, 106-0031, +81 3 3409-1501.
  • VietnamVietnam, 50-11 Moto-yoyogi-cho Shibuya-ku, +81 3 3760-5625.
  • YemenYemen, No.38 Kowa Building 807 4-12-24 Nishi-Azabu Minato-ku, +81 3 3499-7151.
  • ZambiaZambia, 1-10-2 Ebara Shinagawa-ku, +81 3 3491-0121.
  • ZimbabweZimbabwe, 5-9-10 Sirokanedai Minato-ku, +81 3 3280-0331.

From Tokyo, the entire surrounding Kanto region is your oyster. Particularly popular destinations nearby include:

  • Hakone — for hot springs and views ofMount Fuji, Ashinoko Lake.
  • Kawagoe - Old historical town also called "Little Edo". Its main street and castle can take you back in time. 30min train ride from Tokyo station.
  • Kamakura — home to dozens of small temples and one Big Buddha
  • Nikko — grandiose shrine and burial site of Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu
  • Odawara — houses the only Japanese castle in greater Tokyo area
  • Yugawara, Manazuru — for hot springs and coastal resort, eatingsashimiandmikan, views ofManazuru Peninsula, some festivals(Matsuri).
  • Tokyo Disney Resort— withTokyo Disneyland(just like the ones everywhere else) andTokyo Disney Sea(an only-in-Japan theme park which includes some unique rides and some imported rides from Disney parks outside of Japan)
  • Yokohama— Japan's second-largest city and a suburb of Tokyo

The Tokyo area also has some less-famous destinations that are easy day trips from central Tokyo:

  • Ashikaga — historical hometown of a famous shogun clan
  • Hachioji — a refreshing climb up Mt. Takao through a forest to a shrine and beer garden
  • Kawasaki — home to the Nihon Minka-En park with 24 ancient farmhouses (more interesting than it sounds), not to mention the annual Festival of the Iron Penis (Kanamara Matsuri)
  • Kinugawa — Onsen town in Nikko, home toEdo Wonderland Nikko Edomura, a theme park set in the Edo period with shows, ninja, samurai, geisha, et al., in a beautiful mountain setting
  • Fujino — a small town popular with locals and foreigners alike who are interested in the arts and enjoy beautiful scenery

And don't forget the islands to the south of Tokyo:

  • Izu Islands — easily accessible seaside and hot spring getaways
  • Ogasawara Islands — 1000 km away from big-city bustle, for whale watching, diving and those who want to get away from it all

[[Tokyo Disney Resort]] — withTokyo Disneyland(just like the ones everywhere else) andTokyo Disney Sea(an only-in-Japan theme park which includes some unique rides and some imported rides from Disney parks outside of Japan)

[[Kinugawa]] — Onsen town in [[Nikko]], home toEdo Wonderland Nikko Edomura, a theme park set in the Edo period with shows, ninja, samurai, geisha, et al., in a beautiful mountain setting


Popular train routes departing from Tokyo(東京駅)

Nagano | Hiroshima | Niigata | Kyoto | Tokyo | Nagoya | Sendai | Tokyo | Kanazawa | Tokyo | Yokohama | Kamakura(鎌倉駅) | Yamagata | Osaka | Narita airport (nrt) |


Popular train routes arriving in Tokyo(東京駅)

Tokyo | Hiroshima | Yamagata | Narita airport (nrt) | Yokohama | Akita | Yokohama | Nagoya | Tokyo | Osaka | Tokyo | Osaka | Kyoto |